Washington racing trainer Monique Snowden committed suicide Sunday night hours after a promising two-year-old from her stable broke down on the track.

Tragedy Strikes Racing with Trainer’s Suicide

Washington racing trainer Monique Snowden committed suicide Sunday night hours after a promising two-year-old from her stable broke down on the track.

“She wouldn’t leave me and leave the horses like this without saying goodbye,” says Snowden’s husband Dennis Snowden. “I think she was in her wrong mind.”

The couple was testing the waters of a trial separation, but Snowden says they discussed him moving back to the farm in September. “We were best friends and I was her biggest supporter.”

Monique Snowden was a 37-year-old Snohomish resident. She is believed to have jumped off a bridge into the Green River near Enumclaw. Her truck was found abandoned nearby Monday.

The Chilli Man photo by Heather Sacha Photography
The Chilli Man photo by Heather Sacha Photography

The former eventer was reportedly heartbroken after The Chilli Man, a horse she trained, was euthanized after breaking down in a race at Emerald Downs on Sunday. Ownership of The Chilli Man was slated to change hands after the race.

Snowden tells us that his wife struggled with depression since her mother’s death in 2011. He surmises Sunday’s events magnified her internal struggle since she never discussed committing suicide.

“The horse took a bad step – that’s all there is to it. The horse was good to run. This was a tragic accident.”

“Monique caught a lot of flack for this,” Snowden added. “And her depression, and the people around this place that got after her and made ill comments toward her — I think it was enough to push her over the edge [sic].”

“I’m distraught,” Snowden says. “I’ll never get over this.”

If you or someone you know is depressed and can’t see the hope to keep living, there are resources like the Suicide Prevention Lifeline.

Call 1-800-273-TALK to speak with a skilled counselor anytime 24/7.

 

This is not a hobby. It’s late nights and early mornings. It’s struggles and triumphs, it pushes your boundaries and tests your abilities every day. One moment it exposes your weaknesses only to let you shine your brightest in the next.

It is not for everyone, actually it’s hardly for anyone. But in that one moment when it all comes together, when you and your horse are one, that moment is worth all the hard work and sacrifice. It is necessary as breath, as the blood in your veins. No, this is not a hobby, it is a way of life. – unknown