Grand Jury Indicts Monica Thors for Animal Cruelty in Horses' Deaths

Grand Jury Indicts Monica Thors for Animal Cruelty in Horses’ Deaths

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 A Gloucester County Grand Jury indicted a New Jersey horse rescuer on nine felony counts of animal cruelty. Monica Thors, of Mullica Hill, is accused of knowingly causing serious bodily injury to her horses, which led to some of their deaths.

Thors is charged with four third-degree counts and five fourth-degree counts of animal cruelty. The charges stem from her alleged failure to follow veterinarian recommendations between September 2013 and December 2014 to address her horses’ multiple health issues.

Thors allegedly failed to make modifications to her overweight horses’ food intake so they could lose weight. The horses also suffered from chronic laminitis. Four of the horses died or were euthanized. The deceased horses included: 13-year-old mare Princess Grey; 7-year-old mare Aspiration; 14-year-old stallion According to Hoyle; and a 7-year-old stallion According to Prince.

Thors is a former harness racing trainer that was operating the 501(c)(3) organization Monica Thors Animal Rescue, Inc when she was under investigation. The New Jersey Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (NJ SPCA) said it began investigating One of the standardbreds Monica Thors allegedly abused.Thors in August 2013.

No action was taken until the abuse allegations against Thors were made public on social media. Disturbing photos posted appear to show horses’ hooves being drilled and bleeding. Others have their feet and legs wrapped and are lying down as Thors smiles nearby.

In December 2014, Thors’ seven horses and goat were seized. Two horses were euthanized based on the recommendation of the treating veterinarian.

Soon after, Thors was cited with inflicting unnecessary cruelty upon a living creature and one count of failure to provide necessary care. Both are disorderly person charges.

Additional criminal complaints were filed, as we reported in February 2015. The prosecutor reviewed the case and took it before the grand jury last week.

Thors will enter a plea when she is arraigned, as the criminal case gets underway. A date has not been scheduled.

Thors is being represented by the public defender’s office. Assistant Public Defender Kevin Walker said his office does not comment on pending cases.

If convicted, Thors faces a maximum of five-years in prison for a single third-degree crime. Fourth-degree crimes have a prison sentence of up to 18 months.