Equine Veterinarian Convicted of Forgery

Equine Veterinarian Convicted of Forgery

The jury deliberated for just over six-hours before the verdict was read. Michigan equine veterinarian Julie Rossetto was found guilty of two felony charges, including forgery, for creating a fake insurance document after her horse’s death.
Rossetto was also found guilty of uttering and publishing, but acquitted of another of the same charge. The judge dismissed a second forgery charge during the trial.
Rossetto was convicted of forging an insurance document after her reining horse, CF Free Agent (pictured), was euthanized in January 2013. Rossetto admitted creating the document purportedly from Smith-Embry Insurance Associates, Inc. and sending it to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital at Michigan State University.
Rossetto said she authored the fake insurance document titled “Reason for Less Non-Covered Expenses,” because a vet at MSU was supposed to call the insurance company, but failed to do so. In her tape recorded confession to detectives, Rossetto said there was a certain amount of money that the insurance company would not pay because of the lie.
The prosecution also accused Rossetto of creating and sending a fake bill of sale to the insurance company with an alleged purchase price of $35,000 and a forged signature. Documents show Rossetto was attempting to claim an insurance payday of $50,000 for the deceased horse.
The reining horse’s former owners, Darrell Bromley and Connie Ludwig, testified that Rossetto paid $25,000 for the gelding and that no bill of sale was provided.
Rossetto is scheduled for sentencing on June 26. She could face up to 14 years in prison on each count.