JENNIFER WHEELER WINBORNE against HOLLY STANLEY dba BAYRIDGE SHOW STABLES

UNPAID JUDGMENTS

 

Dutchess County

Index No. 50989/18

DECISION, ORDER, AND JUDGMENT AFTER INQUEST

 

The defendant is in default in this action. A judgment of default was granted by decision
and order of September 5, 2018, in which this inquest was scheduled. The plaintiff, Jennifer
Wheeler Winborne, testified as follows: She is from Springtown, Texas. She breeds, raises and
trains “hunter ponies”. On or about September 1, 2011, for $5,000.00, she purchased a stallion pony
called Gayfield’s Way Too Cool (“Cool”). He produced “very trainable kid-friendly ponies.”

In or about February 2016 Plaintiff leased Cool to Defendant for one year, which was then
extended for a second year. Defendant testified that she leased Cool from the plaintiff in order to
start a breeding program for offer to the public. After the two years of leasing Cool expired,
Plaintiff “wanted him home”. In or about March of 2018 she asked for his health papers so she
could get Cool transported to her farm in Texas on a horse trailer. Plaintiff then learned that Cool
was unwell. She found a veterinarian at Rhinebeck Equine, LLP and on or about March 16, 2018
she had Cool brought there for examination, care, and medical treatment. However, on or about
April 3, 2018 Cool had to be euthanized.

Per Exhibit 2 in evidence, the plaintiff incurred $9,109.07 in total expenses for Cool’s care
and treatment at Rhinebeck Equine, LLP. Pursuant to Exhibit 3 in evidence, Plaintiff incurred
$2,500.00 for Cool’s cremation at Connecticut Horse Cremation, LLC in Killingsworth, Connecticut.

The parties’ contract in evidence as Plaintiffs Exhibit 8 provided as follows: Cool’s value
was $5,000.00. He was being leased by Plaintiff to Defendant for breeding purposes for the term
February 15, 2016, through August 1, 2016. There was no monetary fee for the lease. Instead,
Defendant was entitled to five breedings per season with no stud fee charge. The defendant was to
provide Cool with “suitable breeding facilities, proper feed, sufficient water, medical and veterinary

care as required, in a manner consistent with quality horse care practices industry-wide.” Pursuant
to paragraph 8 of the lease, the defendant was to bear “any and all risks of loss from the death of or
any harm to the Stallion only if any such event is caused by the lessee …” However, since Defendant
defaulted in the action, the question of negligence or fault is not now before this court. At the end
of paragraph 11 of the lease, the defendant indicated she wanted to lease Cool again for 2017
season. Although the court was not provided with a signed copy of the Stallion Lease Agreement
both parties acknowledged that this was their agreement and consented to it being entered into
evidence.

The plaintiff seeks damages for her expenses for Cool’s veterinary care, for the purchase
price of Cool (Cool’s value), for lost earnings as a result of Cool’s death and for her pain and
suffering.

Plaintiff claims Defendant breached her contractual obligations to care for Cool and that her
negligent care resulted in his illness and death. The defendant offered testimony to dispute this but
failed to do so by answering the complaint. Defendant has not moved to vacate the default.
Therefore, the issues of liability and any testimony in that regard cannot be considered by the court.
Plaintiff currently has nine of Cool’s offspring, two that she purchased, “Keep It Cool” and
“Be Cool”, which are now nine and fifteen years old respectively. The other seven are five years
old or younger. Plaintiff testified that she also had four more between the ages of five and nine.
She testified that she usually bred two ponies per year from Cool. By way of example of lost
earnings, the plaintiff had admitted into evidence a lease for “Keep It Cool” from December 12, 2016
to December 12, 2017 for $35,000.00. She testified that “Keep it Cool” is now on lease for a year
for $20,000.00.

Plaintiff also testified that because she doesn’t have Cool she has to pay for an outside stud
fee of $1,000 per pony and about $400.00 for each artificial insemination. She claims that Cool
was 21 years old and fertile and speculates that she lost years of leasing Cool’s foals and at least five
years of breeding and that foals are worth $2,500.00 to $5000.00 for weanlings and yearlings,
$5000.00 to $10,000.000 for two to three-year-olds, and $10,000.00 to $25,000.00 for four-year-olds
and up, and more for performance ponies with show records. However, Plaintiff agreed with
the defendant that much of this is speculation because there are no guarantees with breeding, training
or showing.

Plaintiff offered photos as evidence of Cool’s condition when he got to the Defendant’s farm and
in the days leading to the end of his life. She became visibly upset and seeks an award for emotional
pain and suffering.

On cross-examination, the plaintiff acknowledged that it takes two years or more to train a
pony for shows, that she has no actual proof of lost earnings, that she did not stand Cool to the public
for stud fees, and only made money from his ponies that she trained to be show/performance ponies.

Plaintiff testified that the ponies’ value is based upon the ability to promote them, that she raises one
to two per year and shows them “in hand” which means pre-training. She testified that she did not
sell young stock (under three years old) and that she has about five of Cool’s ponies now that are
considered young stock.

Pursuant to the contract, the Defendant was entitled to five breedings per season over the two
seasons during which she leased Cool. The defendant testified that they could not collect semen
from Cool during the first year so there was no money from that in year one. In year two she said
they were only able to use two doses to impregnate outside mares and that this was not sufficient for
her pursuant to the contract. In the first year, she was only able to use Cool as a “live cover stallion”
which means that the mare is brought to the stallion to be impregnated. In year one she got three
foals as a result of live-cover and in year two she got four foals as a result of live cover. Defendant
testified that most people do not want to transport their mares, and instead want the semen shipped
to them.

Judgment in Favor of Plaintiff

Based upon all of the foregoing, it is hereby

ORDERED that Plaintiff is entitled to a judgment against the defendant to include her out of-
pocket expenses for the value of Cool, his veterinary care and his cremation in the sums of
$5,000.00, $9,109.07, and $2,500.00, respectively, less the $4,600.00 Plaintiff acknowledged she
raised through contributions for Cool’s care, for a net total of $12,009.07.

It is further ORDERED that Plaintiff’s claim for emotional pain and suffering due to the loss of
companionship of Cool must be denied. New York does not recognize a cause of action for such
pain and suffering nor is an animal’s value as a companion recoverable as damages, but only its

value as personal property. See, for example, Johnson v. Douglas, 187 Misc.2d 509 (Sup.Ct.,
Nassau Cty 2001); Mercurio v. Weber, 2003 WL 21497325 (District Court, Nassau County 2003).

It is further ORDERED that Plaintiff is entitled to $22,500.00 for the average cost of replacement of foals
for a period of two years. Plaintiff testified she had Cool produce two foals per year. Defendant
acknowledged that she was able to have Cool produce three foals the first year and four foals the
second year. The sum awarded reflects a modest production of foals and is based on Plaintiff’s
experience with Cool since 2011 reflecting what Cool would have produced for Plaintiff over a two
year period and what their value would have been during those years. The balance of the fees sought
by Plaintiff, including for producing show ponies and earnings as a result of those, are based purely
on speculation and, as Plaintiff agreed, there are no guarantees of this type.

 

Accordingly, it is ORDERED

Plaintiff is entitled to a total judgment [against the defendant Holly Stanley / Bayridge Show Stables of 47 Brush Hill Road Millbrook, NY] in the sum of $34,509.07 with interest at the statutory rate from the date of commencement of this action, April 11, 2018, and shall have execution thereon.

The foregoing constitutes the decision and order of the Court.

October 18, 2018

 

View the Judgment of $34,509 against Holly Stanley of Bayridge Show Stables

 

 

Criminal case related to pony’s death

 

New York v Holly Stanley

Holly Stanley Charged with Animal Cruelty in Pony Stallion Death

 

 

Horse Feed Contaminated with Monensin: FDA Warning Letters

Monensin contaminated horse feed

Two feed mills reportedly contaminated horse feed with monensin which led to at least six horses’ deaths.

The U.S. Food & Drug Administration issued both companies Warning Letters this month. Now, the FDA warns Gilman Co-Op Creamery of Gilman, MN and Farmers/Ranchers Cooperative Association in Ainsworth, NE that they could face legal action if they fail to correct multiple violations.

Monensin is an ionophore that improves the feed efficiency for cattle. Although, it is deadly to horses and there is no antidote.

Monensin toxicity may look like a colic and symptoms can progress rapidly to death in some cases. Horses may also suffer from sweating, muscle wasting, bloating, kidney failure, damage to the heart, respiratory distress, stiffness, and the inability to stand.

The FDA states the companies failed to adhere to Current Good Manufacturing Practices for medicated feed mills. Despite requirements of sequencing or equipment cleanout when switching from a medicated feed to a non-medicated feed.

While the FDA claims these regulations are designed to prevent cross-contamination, horses across the states continue to remain vulnerable to monensin exposure due to human error, mechanical failures, and inadequate records.

In August, Horse Authority reported that six horses died after eating Gilman’s custom ‘Horse Blend 985’ feed. A lab analysis detected 143 ppm (parts per million) of monensin in the horse feed.

Last November, Farmers/Ranchers Cooperative Association of Ainsworth recalled it’s horse feed. Nebraska Department of Agriculture tested ‘Sandhills Select Horse Feed’ Lot G00005-00 produced on October 2, 2017, which contained 4 grams per ton of monensin.

These are the feed companies that the FDA is talking about, although there is one that isn’t being discussed. Stay close, as always.

 

Safe horse feed?

So, how do you know which horse feed is safe for your horse? Horse Authority recommends buying horse feed from a “monensin-free” or “ionophore-free” horse feed manufacturer. 

Want to dish on horse feed safety?

Of course, we’re on Facebook or join us at our friendly horse forum, Horse | U Forum to chew on the facts about horse feed.

 

Contact Horse Authority today to discover how your brand can benefit from Sponsor Content and other marketing opportunities.

 

 

 

Are you a horse owner seeking justice after your horses ate contaminated horse feed? click here

 

 

Equine Disease Alerts: October

EIA Confirmed in Alberta Horse

Bonnyville, Alberta

October 9, 2018

 

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) confirms an Alberta horse is positive with Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA).

Therefore, a CFIA investigation is underway. The agency quarantined the index premises located in Bonnyville and that includes all horses on the property. The quarantine remains in effect until all disease response activities are complete, which includes the follow-up blood tests.

Additionally, veterinarians must euthanize any horses that are positive upon blood retests.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Evan Coluccio Gets USEF Suspension for Changing Horse’s Identity

Epic Life

Virginia hunter/jumper professional Evan Coluccio must bid the rated horse show life adieu for six months. The U.S. Equestrian Federation states it suspended the EMC International Stables owner for the misrepresentation of a horse’s identity and green status.

The Hearing Committee reports that it unanimously found Coluccio “knowingly changed the identity of the horse Epic Life.”

Coluccio changed the horse’s registered name from Epic Life (5290954) to Knight Life. It reportedly happened at the Upperville Colt & Horse Show held June 6 to 12, 2016, in Upperville, VA.

 

 

The Committee states he did so in order to compete at the pre-green level, which led to the horse’s sale as a pre-green prospect in 2017. Despite Coluccio’s alleged deceit, the horse was not pre-green eligible.

The horse’s new owner showed him in the green hunters although the gelding was ineligible. The 2008 Mecklenburg has since been renamed to Castlegrace (5405364).

Although, Coluccio failed to appear for his hearing or challenge the allegations brought against him.

The suspension of all horses connected to Collucio and EMC International begins January 1, 2019. He must also pay a $6,000 fine.

 

Criminal Cases

A Virginia court scheduled Coluccio’s preliminary hearing for November in Loudoun District Court. He’s facing felony charges which include eluding police.

Coluccio allegedly attempted to evade police in late July. Deputies report Coluccio caused an accident when he hit an occupied vehicle before he fled the scene on foot which led to his arrest.

Stay with us as we continue to follow this criminal case and another in Florida for retail theft.

 

 

$588K+ Stolen from American Horse Council: Suit

American Horse Council Staff Member

A former American Horse Council staff member allegedly stole more than $588,000 to fund her “lavish lifestyle,” according to a suit filed last week.

The American Horse Council, Inc. and its Foundation filed the lawsuit in the U.S. District Court of Colorado against its former communications director Ashley Furst and her husband, Christopher.

The American Horse Council, Inc. and its Foundation filed the lawsuit in the U.S. District Court of Colorado against its former communications director Ashley Furst and her husband, Christopher.
Ashley and Christopher Furst of Colorado

The AHC accuses the Highland Ranches couple of using the “stolen funds to make large purchases and support a lifestyle they could not otherwise afford”. That includes a home they purchased for $630,000 in 2017 as well as two luxury vehicles.

In 2010, AHC hired Furst, née Cole. She worked from the Washington, D.C. office until 2017, when she began working from Colorado. The complaint states that Furst “orchestrated a complex and carefully-planned criminal enterprise,” that lasted nearly five years.

Even more, AHC didn’t learn it was missing hundreds of thousands of dollars until June 2018, which led to Furst’s termination.

AHC discovered five ways in which Furst allegedly stole funds, including making over $440,000 in direct electronic payments from two AHC accounts to pay Furst’s personal accounts. Afterward, she falsified AHC financial records in an attempt to hide the transfers.

Furst allegedly stole over $63,000 in forged checks and another $53,000 in PayPal transfers from AHC’s account. A self-appointed pay raise added another $29,000 to her fraud.

Using AHC’s investment account as collateral, Furst allegedly attempted to cover her tracks with a $350,000 loan agreement on behalf of the AHC. It was approved although the group canceled it once Furst’s alleged fraud was discovered.

The AHC reported Furst’s theft to the Federal Bureau of Investigation, which has reportedly opened an investigation.

The plaintiffs are seeking injunctive relief, treble damages, and a jury trial.

 

 View American Horse Council Inc et al v. Furst et al

 

 

 

 

 

EIA in Second Horse Leads to Another Colorado Quarantine

Weld County

The Colorado state veterinarian confirms another Weld County horse tested positive for Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA).

The diagnosis comes after a 7-year-old Quarter Horse mare started losing weight and showed signs of anemia. The state quarantined the private horse property that is home to 17 horses.

Although it’s early in the investigation, the state says the second EIA positive horse isn’t related to the kill pen’s EIA positive horse. In a Horse Authority Exclusive, we reported the index EIA positive horse originated from the Fabrizius Livestock kill pen. Furthermore, state veterinarians nationwide continue looking for horses exposed to the kill pen’s EIA positive horse.

As of September 27, Colorado confirms it has located 138 exposed horses. There are 61 horse premises under hold orders in 24 counties, which include: Adams, Arapahoe, Archuleta, Boulder, Costilla, Crowley, Delta, Douglas, Eagle, Elbert, El Paso, Fremont, Gilpin, Gunnison, Huerfano, Jefferson, Larimer, Mesa, Moffat, Montrose, Morgan, Phillips, Sedgwick, and Weld Counties.

The state released five premises from hold orders after successful retests.

Twelve states have located 72 EIA exposed horses. They include horses in Arizona, Idaho, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, Oklahoma, Tennessee, Texas, and Wyoming.

Biting insects typically transmit the blood-borne illness, which makes facility management very important. The use of infected needles can also transmit the disease from equine to equine.

There are no treatment options for infected horses. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) requires euthanasia or strict lifelong quarantine for EIA positive horses.

 

You don’t want to miss our upcoming series on the kill pen industry.

 

 

Equine Disease Alerts: September

Colorado EIA Kill Pen Update

September 24, 2018

 

An epidemiological investigation continues nationally after a Colorado kill pen horse exposed over 200 horses to a lethal disease. 

Consequently, the index horse tested positive for Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA) almost a month ago. Later, the Weld County horse was euthanized. It was located at Fabrizius Livestock, which the state quarantined. The horses at the index premises tested negative for EIA last week. The state confirms they will retest the horses for EIA sometime around October 19.

240 Horses Exposed to Deadly EIA from Colorado Kill Pen

Another two properties related to the kill pen facility, which is operated by Jason Fabrizius, are under hold orders.

In Colorado, officials have found a total of 128 exposed horses in 20 counties. They are Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Crowley, Delta, Douglas, Eagle, Elbert, El Paso, Fremont, Gilpin, Gunnison, Huerfano, Jefferson, Larimer, Mesa, Moffat, Montrose, Phillips, and Weld Counties.

Ten other states have located a total of 64 EIA exposed horses. Those states are Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, Oklahoma, Texas, and Wyoming.

Stay with us as we continue following this developing horse health story.

 

 


Rabies Leads to Equine Euthanasia

Sussex County, DE

September 24, 2018

 

Delaware Ag officials confirm a veterinarian euthanized a mini-donkey in Sussex County due to rabies. 

The 8-year old animal was unable to rise last week after acting abnormally, according to the state’s department of agriculture.

Rabies in horses case photo shows stallion self-mutilation. courtesy: Dr. Ian G. Mayhew
Rabies in a horse case unrelated to the mini-donkey shows a stallion’s self-mutilation. photo Dr. Ian G. Mayhew

Rabies is a zoonotic disease which means the infection can spread directly or indirectly from animals to humans. The incidence of rabies in equines is reportedly low. Although, the virus is transmitted by a bite from an infected animal. It can also enter through an open wound or contact with a mucous membrane, like the eyes of an infected animal.

Clinical signs of rabies in an equine may seem confusing, according to veterinarians. It can look like colic or a neurologic issue.

In unvaccinated equids, rabies progresses rapidly after onset with death 5 to 7 days after the beginning of clinical symptoms. Those symptoms may include fever, blindness, hypersensitivity, aggression, depression, self-mutilation, lameness, paralysis, and sudden death.

However, once transmitted, it is fatal for the horse, donkey or mule since there is no cure.

That’s why it is important to prevent rabies with an annual vaccination. Talk to your veterinarian for more information since there are different vaccine recommendations based on your horse’s needs.

 

 


Virginia Quarantines Loudoun County Horse Farm

Loudoun County, VA

September 24, 2018

 

Virginia’s state veterinarian quarantined a private Loudoun County horse farm for Equine Herpes Myeloencephalopathy (EHM). Initially, a hold order was placed on the farm because a horse originating from the farm tested positive for EHM before being quarantined in Maryland.

Officials state no horses have been on or off the farm in a month so there wasn’t exposure to horses outside the farm.

 

 


Confirms Equine Herpes Myeloencephalopathy (EHM)

Frederick County, VA

September 23, 2018

 

Virginia agriculture officials confirm a Quarter Horse stallion is positive with Equine Herpesvirus Myeloencephalopathy (EHM) or the neurological form of EHV-1.

The horse resides at a small private farm in Frederick County. The Virginia Department of Agriculture confirms there was no exposure to horses off the farm since the stallion hasn’t left the property in several months.

The state quarantined the farm and the horses stabled on the property.

 

 


 

Maryland Confirms Equine Herpes Myeloencephalopathy (EHM) Case

Montgomery County, MD

September 22, 2018

 

Maryland Animal Health officials confirm a Warmblood gelding is positive with Equine Herpesvirus Myeloencephalopathy (EHM). It is the neurologic strain of the equine herpesvirus (EHV-1).

A veterinarian treated the horse as an outpatient on Friday, September 21st, after it became neurologic. It happened at a what the state describes as a “private veterinary clinic” in Loudoun County, Virginia. Afterward, they returned the horse to its private farm in Montgomery County, MD.

Horses infected with the neurologic strain of EHV-1 show clinical signs that typically include mild incoordination, hind end weakness, and loss of bladder function. EHV is highly contagious to horses while it does not pose a threat to humans.

Veterinarians recommend vaccinating against EHV-1 to help prevent the virus although no current vaccine prevents the neurologic strain.

State officials placed a hold order on the Maryland horse farm after isolating the index horse. Eighteen horses live on the property in four barns. Previously, the horse lived with four other horses. Two other barns are more than 30 feet away from the exposed barn.

Maryland Department of Agriculture staff and others are working to ensure strict isolation and biosecurity protocols are in place.

Additionally, an epidemiological investigation is underway.

Veterinarians recommend limiting horse to horse contact and horse to human to horse contact when at horse shows, trail rides, and other public venues. The virus spreads readily through direct contact with infected materials.

Hand soap, alcohol-based hand sanitizers, and sunlight neutralize the virus.

For an in-depth look at EHV-1, click here.

 

 

 

Oregon Judge Says WHOA to Horse’s Lawsuit

Horse sued abusive former owner

An Oregon judge dismissed a $100,000 lawsuit Monday filed in the name of a formerly maltreated horse.

Animal rights advocates filed the suit on behalf of Justice against his former owner. Although, Washington County Pro Tem Judge John Knowles tossed it. He opined animals don’t have a legal standing to sue under state law.

During a hearing last week, one of the attorneys for the Animal Legal Defense Fund argued animals are sentient beings.

No court has ruled animals should have similar rights as human victims that allow them to seek damages through civil action.

Gwendolyn Vercher, Justice’s former owner, pleaded guilty to animal neglect. She is serving three-years probation and cannot own any animals for five years.

 

View Horse Sues Former Abusive Owner Civil Complaint

 

 

240 Horses Exposed to Deadly EIA from Colorado Kill Pen, 100 Shipped Nationwide

Fabrizius Kill Pen

Details emerge as Colorado investigates the locations of 240 horses exposed to the deadly disease Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA).

On Friday, August 28, Fabrizius Livestock in Weld County confirmed on social media that the EIA positive horse came from its kill pen. The post read in part, before its removal,

A horse that ran through our lot,… tested positive for coggins, which is EIA...”

Horse slaughter kill buyer Jason Fabrizius of Eaton has not responded to our request for comment.

Colorado State Veterinarian Keith Roehr, DVM tells us he unable to confirm the identity of the Weld County quarantined premises due to the Livestock Security Act. The index horse remains the only EIA positive currently.

A horse transporter unlawfully moved the index horse from Colorado to Wyoming. In the process, dozens of horses were exposed before it returned to Colorado, was retested leading to confirmation of EIA, and euthanasia.

Two premises associated with the quarantine are under a hold order. Similar to a quarantine, the state restricts all livestock movement until 60-day retests confirm there are no EIA positive horses.

Dr. Roehr says he’s not familiar with the term “kill pen,” although emphasizes that the state restricts the movement of livestock. It has no control over individuals when a location is quarantined.

Coggins Test Requirements

The state confirms 100 exposed horses shipped to 20 states nationwide, including Oklahoma, which prompted an epidemiological investigation. In fact, Oklahoma has quarantined two premises, Assistant State Veterinarian Michael Herrin, DVM tells Horse Authority.

Of 140 horses reportedly still in Colorado, the state has located 57 at last count, across 15 premises in 13 counties, according to Dr. Roehr. Some are in Adams, Arapahoe, Crowley, Delta, Douglas, El Paso, Mesa, Montrose, and Weld Counties.

Due to the current level of progress, Dr. Roehr states he is confident they will find “if not all, most of the [240] horses”…

equine infectious anemia coggins test requirements
What does the law require when it comes to a Coggins in Colorado? It tests for EIA.

The deadly disease affects equids, which includes horses, donkeys, and mules. It is a viral disease that attacks the horse’s immune system. Affected horses can carry the disease without symptoms for years. Likewise, they may become acutely or chronically infected.

A Coggins determines if there are antibodies present in the horse’s blood indicating the presence of EIA. Although, Colorado doesn’t require horse sellers to transfer a Coggins to the buyer at the time of horse sale.

Any horses Fabrizius ships into Colorado must have a negative Coggins less than a year old. So, how long do the Fabrizius kill pen horses sit on the lot after shipping in from Montana? If you have purchased one of these horses, you tell us based on your horse’s documents!

Additionally, when transporting horses over state lines, each horse needs a current Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (CVI) which is a health certificate. It must accompany the animal along with a current negative Coggins, which, again is required to travel across state lines.

Those that break these laws can face up to a $1,000 fine per horse in Colorado.

EIA Symptoms

Clinical signs of EIA include fever, weakness, weight loss, anemia and edema, and death. All infected equines, including those that are asymptomatic, are carriers of the disease. There is no cure or vaccine to prevent EIA.

Biting insects typically transmit the blood-borne illness. The use of infected needles can also transmit the disease from equine to equine.

There are no treatment options for infected horses so the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) requires euthanasia or strict lifelong quarantine for EIA positive horses.

To help protect your horses from EIA, veterinarians recommend insect control, good horse facility sanitation, testing new equines with a Coggins before bringing them onto your property, and quarantining new equines for 45 days away from all other horses.

If you may have purchased a horse from July 18 through August 20 in Weld County or would like more information, contact the Colorado State Veterinarian’s Office.

 

You don’t want to miss our upcoming series on the kill pen industry.

 

 

 

 

Horses’ Deaths Land Max Jail Sentence in New York Animal Cruelty Case

Jeanne Ryan “heinous offense”

A New York Judge sentenced a Welsh Pony breeder to the maximum sentence of two years jail Thursday. It comes after the court found Jeanne Ryan, 52, of Goshen guilty of 20 counts of animal cruelty last month.

“Never has of animal abuse cried out for a lengthier term than a maximum of two years,” Orange County Judge Robert H. Freehill told the defendant.

To illustrate his point, Judge Freehill said it was hard to find such “inhuman behavior” in some of his homicide cases. “This is a heinous offense. It’s hard to say it wasn’t intentional…”

Ryan’s conviction on 10 counts of aggravated animal cruelty stems from nine horses’ deaths and the near starvation of a tenth. Shamus the pony was locked in a stall with the carcass of a former stablemate at Ryan’s Argus Farm. He ate wood in the stall since he had no food or water.

A former police officer, Ryan was also convicted of 10 misdemeanor counts for failure to provide her horses the necessary sustenance. Ryan’s attempts to blame her teen son were unsuccessful.

Judge Freehill told Ryan that she cannot own or have custody of any animal for 15 years. Additionally, Ryan will be listed in the Orange County Animal Abuser Registry during those years. The Registry was created in 2015 as a part of Rocky’s Law.

Albany and Rockland Counties also have Animal Abuser Registries.

The judge scheduled a hearing for October 2. He may award restitution for incurred expenses by the horse rescue that cared for the emaciated pony Shamus. The group is seeking just over $2500.

 

View Case

 

 

550 horses Fly to U.S. for Big Equestrian Competition

23 horse flights underway

Some of the world’s top equine athletes are arriving by air to small-town North Carolina. The FEI calls it the ‘largest commercial airlift of horses’.

The first 67 of 550, which epitomize the most amazing specimens of equine flesh, already touched hoof to Tryon turf. Their arrival is ahead of the FEI World Equestrian Games™ Tryon 2018.

Horse transportation company Peden Bloodstock specializes in the precision of moving equine athletes by air. The Dutta Corporation assisted with the logistics of the horses’ flights.

550 horses are flying to the U.S. for 2018 WEG Tryon
550 horses are flying to the U.S. for 2018 WEG Tryon

Horses from across six continents will arrive on flights into Greenville-Spartanburg International Airport (GSP) in South Carolina. The horses fly into the U.S. on one of 23 horse flights. The flights originate from cities including Liège (BEL), Dubai (UAE), and others.

Upon their arrival, the horses are transferred from the specially designed Boeing 777 to a horse transporter, without stepping onto South Carolina soil. Then, it’s off to North Carolina. The journey is 50 mi. to the Tryon International Equestrian Center where the competition is live from September 11 to the 23rd.

“These horses are finely-tuned equine athletes and are not only very valuable, but they must arrive in peak competition condition…,” FEI President Ingmar De Vos said.

They will join another 270 horses traveling by land where they will meet their human partners. Competitors from more than 70 countries will compete.

The Games are world championships in the FEI’s eight Olympic disciplines. Likewise, the competition is a qualifier for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. The disciplines include Eventing, Jumping, Dressage, Driving, Endurance, Reining, and Vaulting. Also included is the Paralympic sport of Para-Dressage.

 

 

 

6 Horse Deaths from Monensin Contaminated Feed: FDA

Gilman Co-Op Creamery

Six horses died this past summer after eating horse feed allegedly contaminated with monensin. The Food and Drug Administration is investigating Gilman Co-Op Creamery of Gilman, MN.

The FDA states Gilman Co-Op failed to clean-out its equipment properly after mixing medicated cattle feed which contains monensin, an ionophore. As a result, the horse feed became contaminated.

Monensin improves the feed efficiency for cattle although it is highly poisonous to horses. Monensin’s toxic effects damage the horse’s heart and skeletal muscles. The level of monensin toxicity is dose and individual dependent.

Symptoms of ionophore poisoning may include colic, sweating, muscle wasting, bloating, kidney failure, damage to the heart, respiratory distress, stiffness, and the inability to stand. Furthermore, acute toxicity may progress rapidly. So, affected horses may not exhibit many symptoms prior to death.

A single farm took delivery of the custom horse feed in early June. One horse was unable to stand the same day the farm began feeding Gilman’s custom ordered horse feed. Due to the horse’s decline, the farm’s veterinarian euthanized the horse two days later.

By day four, two more horses were dead. Ultimately, three more horses died.

The investigation continues, according to the FDA.

 

Contact Horse Authority today to discover how your brand can benefit from Sponsor Content and other marketing opportunities.

 

 

 

Are you a horse owner seeking justice after your horses ate contaminated horse feed? click here

 

 

 

Horsemen’s Tack Employee Guilty of Conspiracy to Distribute Misbranded RX Horse Drugs

Darren B. Stratton

An employee of Horsemen’s Tack, Inc. pleaded guilty to conspiring to distribute misbranded prescription horse drugs Thursday.

During his time at the business in 2017, Darren Stratton, 45, of Haverhill, MA sold customers equine drugs without the necessary veterinary prescriptions, according to U.S. Attorney Scott Murray.

The Horsemen’s Tack website, which is no longer online, indicated that the business had a “vet on call.” Prosecutors say there was never a veterinarian on call at the New Hampshire business. Instead, Horsemen’s Tack had a long-standing relationship with a veterinarian licensed in New Hampshire.

Prosecutors say Stratton regularly used the veterinarian’s name and license. Although the veterinarian never visited the store, did not examine horses and provided no actual veterinary services, prosecutors say Stratton used the veterinarian’s name and license for ordering prescription drugs.

“When prescription drugs are sold unlawfully, they can end up in the wrong hands or be used for illicit purposes,” said U.S. Attorney Murray.  “We will continue to work closely with the FDA to protect the public by enforcing the laws related to prescription drugs.”

Federal agents executed a search warrant last September at the operation. They recovered a customer list, drugs, and vials with labels printed on site.

During the conspiracy Stratton and Horsemen’s Tack marketed, sold, and distributed numerous drugs for performance-enhancement in racehorses, including levothyroxine, estrone, amikacin, methocarbamol, dexamethasone, tranexamic acid, and erythropoietin/EPO, without lawful prescriptions and without the required labels.

Horsemen’s Tack operators include the following individuals, according to its website: President Dana Mindes, Jeffrey Mindes, and Ronnie Stratton, the father of Darren Stratton.

Stratton faces sentencing in December.

40,000 Year Old Horse Preserved by Ice Age: Scientists

Horse history

Scientists unearthed a baby horse that they say lived 40,000 years ago in Siberia.

A joint expedition by scientists from Russia and Japan led to the treasure. Researchers estimate the foal was three-months-old when it died although the cause of death remains a mystery. They say there are no visible wounds on the horse.

“This is the first find in the world find of a prehistoric horse of such a young age and with such an amazing level of preservation,” said Semyon Grigoryev head of the Mammoth Museum in Yakutsk and expedition team member. The horse still has it’s hair, tail, and organs.

The team released a photo of their historic find of the foal covered in a mud-looking substance provided by mother nature.

More details about the time period during which the foal lived will be made available after the soil samples are examined.

For more about this historic find, click here.

 

California Veterinary Medical Board: Accused Melissa Ann Tyson, DVM

BEFORE THE VETERINARY MEDICAL BOARD
DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS
THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA

 

MELISSA ANN TYSON, DVM

CROWN CITY VETERINARY MEDICAL GROUP, INC.

2657 E. Washington Boulevard
Pasadena, CA 91107

Veterinary Medical License VET 13995

CROWN CITY VETERINARY MEDICAL
GROUP, INC.

MELISSA ANN TYSON, DVM
Managing Licensee
2657 E. Washington Boulevard
Pasadena, CA 91107
Premises Permit No. HSP 5890

Complainant alleges:

PARTIES

1. Annemarie Del Mugnaio (Complainant) brings this Accusation solely in her official
capacity’as the Executive Officer Of the Veterinary Medical Board, Department of Consumer
Affairs.

ACCUSATION

2. On or about May 25, 2000, the Veterinary Medical Board issued Veterinary Medicine
License Number VET 13995 to Melissa Ann Tyson (Respondent Tyson). The veterinary license
was in full force and effect at all times relevant to the charges brought herein and will expire on

October 31, 2018, unless renewed.

3. On or about November 24, 2003, the Veterinary Medical Board issued Premises
Permit Number HSP 5890 to Crown City Veterinary Medical Group, Inc., with Melissa Ann
Tyson as the managing licensee (Respondent Premises). The Premises Permit was in full force
and effect at all times relevant to the charges brought herein and will expire on May 31, 2018,
unless renewed.

JURISDICTION

4. This Accusation is brought before the Veterinary Medical Board (Board), Department
of Consumer Affairs, under the authority of the following laws. All section references are to the
Business and Professions Code unless otherwise indicated.

5. Section 118, subdivision (b) of the Code provides that the suspension, expiration,
surrender or cancellation of a license shall not deprive the Board of jurisdiction to proceed with a
disciplinary action during the period within. which the license may be renewed, restored, reissued
or reinstated. Pursuant to section 4843.5 of the Code, an expired certificate of registration may be
renewed at any time within five years after its expiration.

6. Section 4875 of the Code provides, in pertinent part, that the Board may revoke or
suspend the license of any person to practice veterinary medicine, or any branch thereof, in this
state for any causes provided in the Veterinary Medicine Practice Act (Bus. & Prof. Code, §4800,
et seq.). In addition, the Board has the authority to assess a fine not in excess of $5,000 against a
licensee for any of the causes specified in section 4883 of that code. Such fine may be assessed in
lieu of, or in addition to, a suspension or revocation.

7. Section 4853.6 of the Code provides, in pertinent part, that the Board. shall withhold,
suspend or revoke the registration of veterinary premises when the license of the licensee manager to
practice veterinary medicine is revoked or suspended.

8. Section 4883 of the Code states:

 . . . The board may deny, revoke, or suspend a license or assess a fine as provided in

Section 4875 for any of the following…

(c) Violation or attempting to violate, directly or indirectly, any of the provisions

of this chapter.

(d) Fraud or dishonesty in applying, treating, or reporting on tuberculin or other biological tests,

(g) Unprofessional conduct, that includes, but is not limited, to the following:

(i) Fraud, deception, negligence, or incompetence in the practice of veterinary
medicine.
(j) Aiding or abetting in any acts that are in violation of any of the provisions of this chapter.

9. California Code of Civil Procedure section 1822.50 states:

An inspection warrant is an order, in writing, in the name of the people, signed by a judge
of a court of record, directed to a state or local official, commanding him to conduct any
inspection required or authorized by state or local law or regulation relating to building, fire,
safety, plumbing, electrical, health, labor, or zoning.

10. California Food and Agricultural Code section 9562 states:

(a) Subject to the rights and procedures established pursuant to Chapter 4.5 (commencing
23 with Section 11400) of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code, and in accordance with
regulations adopted pursuant to this code, the State Veterinarian shall impose a quarantine if he or
she believes, upon any basis reasonably supportable by standard epidemiological practice or
credible scientific research, that a population of domestic animals or food product from animals
has contracted, or may carry, an illness, infection, pathogen, contagion, toxin, or condition that,

without intervention, could transmit an illness that could kill or seriously damage other animals or

humans, including, in addition to the original condition, those clinically plausible secondary
illnesses, infections, pathogens, contagions, toxins, or conditions arising from the effects of the
original.
(b) (1) Because the authority conferred by this section is designed to protect the health and
safety of the citizens of this state, the authority shall be interpreted broadly to give full effect to
the “purpose of protecting the public health and safety and shall be construed to include the
imposition of quarantines in the circumstances of natural disaster, Whether occurring or imminent,
or declared emergencies.
(2) In furtherance of the objectives of the quarantine, the State Veterinarian may impose
restrictions not only on the affected animals themselves. and the uses to which those animals may
be put, but on products produced from, by, or with those animals in order to minimize the risk or
spread of food-borne illness.
(3) The State Veterinarian’s quarantine powers set forth in this section expressly include
the power to order movement, segregation, isolation, or destruction of animals or food products,
as Well as the power to hold animals or food products in place,

11. California Food and Agricultural Code section 9563 states:
It is unlawful for any person to move or allow to be moved any of the animals, food product
from animals, vehicles, farm equipment, farm products, or other materials that are subject to
restrictions established pursuant to Section 9562 or 9569 unless that person has first obtained
authorization from the State Veterinarian.

12. California Food and Agricultural Code section 9564 states:
If it is necessary to restrict the movements of animals pursuant to Section 9562, the State
Veterinarian may fix and proclaim the boundaries of a quarantine area in lieu of separate,
individual orders issued to each owner pursuant to Section 9562. While the boundaries are in
force, it is unlawful for any person to move or allow to be moved any such animals from or within
the boundaries of the Quarantine area, unless that person is authorized to do so by the State
Veterinarian.

13. California Food and Agricultural Code section 9691 states:

It is unlawful for any person to remove or cause to be removed any animal from any

district, area, or premises which is quarantined pursuant to this chapter, except upon the

conditions Which are prescribed in this chapter.

14. California Food and Agricultural Code section 9695 states: It is unlawful for any person to hide,

secrete, or fail to disclose any animal or property that is suffering from, or that has been

exposed or potentially exposed to any disease subject to a current quarantine order or to fail

to disclose the whereabouts of that animal or property.

COST RECOVERY

15. Section 125.3 of the Code provides, in pertinent part, that the Board may request the
administrative law judge to direct a licentiate found to have committed a violation or violations of
the licensing act to pay a sum not to exceed the reasonable costs of the investigation and
enforcement of the case, with failure of the licentiate to comply subjecting the license to not being
renewed or reinstated. If a case settles, recovery of investigation and enforcement costs may be
included in a stipulated settlement.

FIRST CAUSE FOR DISCIPLINE
(Unprofessional Conduct)

16. Respondents Tyson and Premises are subject to disciplinary action under section
4883, subdivision (g) of the Code, in conjunction with California Food and Agriculture Code
sections 9562, 9563, 9564 and 9691, in that Respondent Tyson, displayed unprofessional conduct
by Violating a mandatory quarantine on November 22, 2016, when she removed her horse from a
state-mandated quarantine premise after it had exhibited clinical signs of a contagious disease.
Respondent Tyson further engaged in unprofessional conduct when she failed to comply with
enhanced biosecurity measures. The circumstances are as follows:

17. Commencing on or about November 3, 2016, the California Department of Food and
Agriculture (CDFA) issued equine quarantines at the Los Angeles Equestrian Center (LAEC) for

horses stabled in Barn A due to an outbreak of Equine Herpes Virus type 1 (EHV-l) pursuant to
it’s authority under Food and Agriculture Code section 9562. CDFA also ordered enhanced
biosecurity measures for the horses including mandatory twice daily temperature monitoring of all
animals in the quarantined area, security checkpoints, quarantine signage, caution tape and
barricades, bleach foot baths, and visitors must park away from the property.

18. On November 8, 2016, the equine quarantines were expanded to include horses
stabled at LAEC Barns B and C.

19. At all times relevant, Respondent Tyson was the owner and/or agent of a horse
stabled in Barn C at LAEC, known as “Emmy.”

20. On or about November 22, 2016, Respondent Tyson was notified by a CDFA
representative that Emmy had contracted a fever and needed to remain on the premises in
accordance with the quarantine procedures while they were awaiting EHV-l test results.

21. Instead, at approximately 5:00 pm. on November 22, 2016, after having been notified
of Emmy’s fever and while test results were still pending, Respondent Tyson came to LEAC with
a horse trailer and removed Emmy from the CDFA mandated quarantine without prior
authorization.

22. Respondent Tyson’s removal of Emmy from the quarantined area constituted
unprofessional conduct in that it violated the quarantine and allowed for the potential spread of
the infectious agent/disease to healthy horses at LEAC and placed healthy animals at risk of
contracting a dangerous and highly contagious disease outside the perimeter of the quarantine
area.

23. Respondent Tyson further exhibited unprofessional conduct when she failed to
comply with enhanced biosecurity measures put in place during the quarantine that were intended
to prevent the introduction and spread of EHV-l infectious diseases.

SECOND CAUSE FOR DISCIPLINE

(Unprofessional Conduct-Misrepresentation Regarding Clinical Findings of Infected Horse)

24. Respondents are subject to disciplinary action under section 4883, subdivisions (d),
(g) and (i) of the Code in that on November 22, 2016, Respondent Tyson misrepresented that
Emmy did not have a fever and was not displaying signs of illness and removed Emmy from Barn C
at LAEC where the horse had been subject to a CDFA quarantine.

THIRD CAUSE FOR DISCIPLINE
(Unprofessional Conduct-Failure to Disclose Location of infected animal)

25. Respondents are subject to disciplinary action under section 4883, subdivisions (g)
and (j) of the Code in conjunction with Food and Agriculture Code section 9695 where
Respondent Tyson failed to disclose the location of Emmy, an infected horse after the horse was
unlawfully removed from the LAEC mandatory quarantine on November 22, 2016. When
requested by the CDFA to provide Emmy’s location, Respondent Tyson failed and refused.
Moreover, even after CDFA obtained a court-ordered Inspection Warrant under Code of Civil. i
Procedure section 1822.50, Respondent Tyson refused to allow the inspectors to perform a
physical inspection of the horses present on her property on December 30, 2016, to determine
whether they were infected. Respondent Tyson’s actions constituted unprofessional conduct in
that she caused more than a 30-day delay in the containment of the spread of the EHV-l virus
and the potential exposure of the virus to other horses.

FOURTH CAUSE FOR DISCIPLINE
(Deception)

26. Respondents are subject to disciplinary action under section 4883, subdivisions (c), (i)
and (j) of the Code in that Respondent Tyson engaged in deception with the CDFA relating to the
failure to disclose the true circumstances relating to date and time of the euthanasia of the horse,
Emmy, after Respondent Tyson unlawfully removed Emmy from the mandatory quarantine.

The circumstances are as follows.

27. Respondent Tyson made false statements to CDFA when she stated her staff met with A.P.,

a representative of C.S., Emmy’s prior owner, to return ownership of Emmy back to C.S.

However, A.P. did not represent CS. and CS. did not authorize the transfer of ownership
from Respondent Tyson back to himself.

28. Respondent Tyson made false statements to CDFA when she stated that she received
a text message from her veterinary technician, Herbert Ramirez, at approximately 2:15 am. on
November 23, 2016, stating that A.P., as representative of CS, requested the euthanasia of
Emmy. However, A.P. was not a representative of CS. and CS. never requested euthanasia.

29. Respondent Tyson made false statements to CDFA when she stated that the pick-up,
disposal, and rendering of Emmy’s body occurred on November 23, 2016. However, this
information was false.

WHEREFORE, Complainant requests that a hearing be held on the matters herein alleged,
and that following the hearing, the Veterinary Medical Board issue a decision:
1.Revoking or suspending Veterinary Medical License Number VET 13995, issued to
Melissa Ann Tyson;
2. Revoking or suspending Premises Permit Number HSP 5890, issued to, Crown City
Veterinary Medical Group, Inc. with Melissa Ann Tyson as the managing licensee;
3. Ordering Melissa Ann Tyson and Crown City Veterinary Medical Group, Inc. jointly
and severally to pay the Veterinary Medical Board the reasonable costs of the investigation and
enforcement of this case, pursuant to Business and Professions Code section 125.3;
4. Assessing a fine against Melissa Ann Tyson, not in excess of $5,000 for any of the
causes specified in Business and Professions Code section 4883; and
5. Taking such other and further action as deemed necessary and proper.

 

View California Veterinary Medical Board Complaint

 


 

EHV Quarantine Violated by California Vet-Horse Owner

 

 

COMMONWEALTH OF VIRGINIA v. ROBIN RENEE VINCE

Nottoway County

No. CR-16000086-01

Robin Vince is a convicted felon with a prior animal cruelty conviction.
Robin Vince

 

July 2016

Indictment

Four felony animal cruelty counts (second offense within five years)

40 misdemeanor counts

[NOTE: In May 2017, the state nolle prosequi the charges against Robin Vince’s daughter Rhiannan Vitiello.]

 

May 2017 Trial 

Guilty

3 felony, 23 misdemeanor counts animal cruelty

Sentence

One-year jail, one-year suspended

No ownership or possession of any animal

 

Currently incarcerated at Piedmont Regional Jail

Scheduled release date August 8, 2018

 

May 1, 2018

Judge grants bond.

 

The Piedmont Regional Jail released Robin Vince from custody on May 3, 2018. 

 

Vince Sentenced for Animal Cruelty

Convicted Animal Abusers Face 132 Counts Animal Cruelty in VA

40 Horses Seized in Virginia from Convicted Animal Abuser

 


Nottoway County

No. 13-000199-00

 

Arrest

November 7, 2013

 

Charge

Cruelty to animals

Guilty at trial

Sentence

12 months jail, all suspended

$1,000 fine

$3826.74 costs

 

Virginia Horse Farm Owner Convicted of Animal Cruelty – Again

 

Pony Cookies with Love

Peppermint Kisses for Ponies

Christmas means family, friends, and all of this puts me in the mood to bake, even for my ponies. A half cup flour, a quarter cup oats, apple, and lots of love go into these homemade Peppermint Kisses.

Here’s a recipe for Peppermint Kisses you can share with everyone at the barn. Or imagine Christmas morning when all of the horses’ stockings are full of these tiny delights from a secret gift giver. How fun for everyone!

 

Here’s what you’ll need. 

1 1/4 cup steel cut oats

3/4 cup molasses

1/2 cup  flour

1/2 cup flax seed

2 tsp cornstarch

1/4 cup water

1/4 cup apple pieces

12 peppermint candies

Now that we have everything we’re ready to bake.

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

2. Mix molasses and oats until oats are coated then gradually stir in your flour, flax seed, apples, cornstarch until mixed.

3. Grease muffin tin then fill them half full.

4. Bake for 15 minutes or until done.

5. Press peppermints onto tops then remove muffins from tin and let cool.

6. Feed generously to loved ponies and horses!

 

Like anything in the kitchen, you can add your creativity and love to make this recipe your own!

Store in a sealed container.

 

 

 

STATE OF NEW YORK v JEANNE RYAN

Orange County

No. 00785-2017

Find closed civil and criminal equine court cases at Horse Authority. Read the court documents and get the final dispositions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

October 30, 2017

Orange County Grand Jury Indicts Jeanne Ryan

 

THE GRAND JURY OF THE COUNTY OF ORANGE, by this Indictment, accuses the defendant of the crime of AGGRAVATED CRUELTY TO ANIMALS, in violation of the provisions of Section 353-a, Subdivision 1, of the Agriculture and Markets Law of the State of New York, committed as follows:

The said defendant, on or about and between the 1st day of March, 2017, and the 29th day of July, 2017, in the County of Orange, State of New York, with no justifiable purpose, did intentionally kill or cause serious physical injury to a companion animal, to wit: a horse, with aggravated cruelty.

SECOND COUNT

AND THE GRAND JURY AFORESAID, by this Indictment, further accuses the defendant, of the crime of

AGGRAVATED CRUELTY TO ANIMALS, in violation of the provisions of Section 353-a, Subdivision 1, of the Agriculture and Markets Law of the State of New York, committed as follows:

The said defendant, on or about and between the 1st day of March, 2017, and the 29th day of July, 2017, in the County of Orange, State of New York, with no justifiable purpose, did intentionally kill or cause serious physical injury to a companion animal, to wit: a horse, with aggravated cruelty.

THIRD COUNT

AND THE GRAND JURY AFORESAID, by this Indictment, further accuses the defendant, of the crime of

AGGRAVATED CRUELTY TO ANIMALS, in violation of the provisions of Section 353-a, Subdivision 1, of the Agriculture and Markets Law of the State of New York, committed as follows:

The said defendant, on or about and between the 1st day of March, 2017, and the 29th day of July, 2017,in the County of Orange, State of New York, with no justifiable purpose, did intentionally kill or cause serious physical injury to a companion animal, to wit: a horse, with aggravated cruelty.

FOURTH COUNT

AND THE GRAND JURY AFORESAID, by this Indictment, further accuses the defendant, of the crime of

AGGRAVATED CRUELTY TO ANIMALS, in violation of the provisions of Section 353-a, Subdivision 1, of the Agriculture and Markets Law of the State of New York, committed as follows:

The said defendant, on or about and between the 1st day of March, 2017, and the 29th day of July, 2017, in the County of Orange, State of New York, with no justifiable purpose, did intentionally kill or cause serious physical injury to a companion animal, to wit: a horse, with aggravated cruelty.

FIFTH COUNT

AND THE GRAND JURY AFORESAID, by this Indictment, further accuses the defendant, of the crime of

AGGRAVATED CRUELTY TO ANIMALS, in violation of the provisions of Section 353-a, Subdivision 1, of the Agriculture and Markets Law of the State of New York, committed as follows:

The said defendant, on or about and between the 1st day of March, 2017, and the 29th day of July, 2017, in the County of Orange, State of New York, with no justifiable purpose, did intentionally kill or cause serious physical injury to a companion animal, to wit: a horse, with aggravated cruelty.

SIXTH COUNT

AND THE GRAND JURY AFORESAID, by this Indictment, further accuses the defendant, of the crime of

AGGRAVATED CRUELTY TO ANIMALS, in violation of the provisions of Section 353-a, Subdivision 1, of the Agriculture and Markets Law of the State of New York, committed as follows:

The said defendant, on or about and between the 1st day of March, 2017, and the 29th day of July, 2017, in the County of Orange, State of New York, with no justifiable purpose, did intentionally kill or cause serious physical injury to a companion animal, to wit: a horse, with aggravated cruelty.

SEVENTH COUNT

AND THE GRAND JURY AFORESAID, by this Indictment, further accuses the defendant, of the crime of

AGGRAVATED CRUELTY TO ANIMALS, in violation of the provisions of Section 353-a, Subdivision 1, of the Agriculture and Markets Law of the State of New York, committed as follows:

The said defendant, on or about and between the 1st day of March, 2016, and the 1st day of March, 2017, in the County of Orange, State of New York, with no justifiable purpose, did intentionally kill or cause serious physical injury to a companion animal, to wit: a horse, with aggravated cruelty.

EIGHTH COUNT

AND THE GRAND JURY AFORESAID, by this Indictment, further accuses the defendant, of the crime of

AGGRAVATED CRUELTY TO ANIMALS, in violation of the provisions of Section 353-a, Subdivision 1, of the Agriculture and Markets Law of the State of New York, committed as follows:

The said defendant, on or about and between the 1st day of March, 2016, and the 1st day of March, 2017, in the County of Orange, State of New York, with no justifiable purpose, did intentionally kill or cause serious physical injury to a companion animal, to wit: a horse, with aggravated cruelty.

NINTH COUNT

AND THE GRAND JURY AFORESAID, by this Indictment, further accuses the defendant, of the crime of

AGGRAVATED CRUELTY TO ANIMALS, in violation of the provisions of Section 353-a, Subdivision 1, of the Agriculture and Markets Law of the State of New York, committed as follows:

The said defendant, on or about and between the 1st day of March, 2016, and the 1st day of March, 2017, in the County of Orange, State of New York, with no justifiable purpose, did intentionally kill or cause serious physical injury to a companion animal, to wit: a horse, with aggravated cruelty.

TENTH COUNT

AND THE GRAND JURY AFORESAID, by this Indictment, further accuses the defendant, of the crime of

AGGRAVATED CRUELTY TO ANIMALS, in violation of the provisions of Section 353-a, Subdivision 1, of the Agriculture and Markets Law of the State of New York, committed as follows:

The said defendant, on or about and between the 1st day of March, 2016, and the 1st day of March, 2017, in the County of Orange, State of New York, with no justifiable purpose, did intentionally kill or cause serious physical injury to a companion animal, to wit: a horse, with aggravated cruelty.

ELEVENTH COUNT

AND THE GRAND JURY AFORESAID, by this Indictment, further accuses the defendant, of the crime of OVERDRIVING, TORTURING AND INJURING ANIMALS, in violation of the provisions of Section 353 of the Agriculture and Markets Law of the State of New York, committed as follows:

The said defendant, on or about and between the 1st day of March, 2017, and the 29th day of July, 2017, in the County of Orange, State of New York, did unjustifiably injure, maim, mutilate, or kill an animal, or did deprive an animal of necessary sustenance, food or drink, or caused or permitted an animal to be deprived of necessary food or drink or did further an act of cruelty to an animal, to wit: a horse, or did further such an act of cruelty.

TWELFTH COUNT

AND THE GRAND JURY AFORESAID, by this Indictment, further accuses the defendant, of the crime of OVERDRIVING, TORTURING AND INJURING ANIMALS, in violation of the provisions of Section 353 of the Agriculture and Markets Law of the State of New York, committed as follows:

The said defendant, on or about and between the 1st day of March, 2017, and the 29th day of July, 2017, in the County of Orange, State of New York, did unjustifiably injure, maim, mutilate, or kill an animal, or did deprive an animal of necessary sustenance, food or drink, or caused or permitted an animal to be deprived of necessary food or drink or did further an act of cruelty to an animal, to wit: a horse, or did further such an act of cruelty.

THIRTEEN COUNT

AND THE GRAND JURY AFORESAID, by this Indictment, further accuses the defendant, of the crime of OVERDRIVING, TORTURING AND INJURING ANIMALS, in violation of the provisions of Section 353 of the Agriculture and Markets Law of the State of New York, committed as follows:

The said defendant, on or about and between the 1st day of March, 2017, and the 29th day of July, 2017, in the County of Orange, State of New York, did unjustifiably injure, maim, mutilate, or kill an animal, or did deprive an animal of necessary sustenance, food or drink, or caused or permitted an animal to be deprived of necessary food or drink or did further an act of cruelty to an animal, to wit: a horse, or did further such an act of cruelty.

FOURTEENTH COUNT

AND THE GRAND JURY AFORESAID, by this Indictment, further accuses the defendant, of the crime of OVERDRIVING, TORTURING AND INJURING ANIMALS, in violation of the provisions of Section 353 of the Agriculture and Markets Law of the State of New York, committed as follows:

The said defendant, on or about and between the 1st day of March, 2017, and the 29th day of July, 2017, in the County of Orange, State of New York, did unjustifiably injure, maim, mutilate, or kill an animal, or did deprive an animal of necessary sustenance, food or drink, or caused or permitted an animal to be deprived of necessary food or drink or did further an act of cruelty to an animal, to wit: a horse, or did further such an act of cruelty.

FIFTEENTH COUNT

AND THE GRAND JURY AFORESAID, by this Indictment, further accuses the defendant, of the crime of OVERDRIVING, TORTURING AND INJURING ANIMALS, in violation of the provisions of Section 353 of the Agriculture and Markets Law of the State of New York, committed as follows:

The said defendant, on or about and between the 1st day of March, 2017, and the 29th day of July, 2017, in the County of Orange, State of New York, did unjustifiably injure, maim, mutilate, or kill an animal, or did deprive an animal of necessary sustenance, food or drink, or caused or permitted an animal to be deprived of necessary food or drink or did further an act of cruelty to an animal, to wit: a horse, or did further such an act of cruelty.

SIXTEENTH COUNT

AND THE GRAND JURY AFORESAID, by this Indictment, further accuses the defendant, of the crime of OVERDRIVING, TORTURING AND INJURING ANIMALS, in violation of the provisions of Section 353 of the Agriculture and Markets Law of the State of New York, committed as follows:

The said defendant, on or about and between the 1st day of March, 2017, and the 29th day of July, 2017, in the County of Orange, State of New York, did unjustifiably injure, maim, mutilate, or kill an animal, or did deprive an animal of necessary sustenance, food or drink, or caused or permitted an animal to be deprived of necessary food or drink or did further an act of cruelty to an animal, to wit: a horse, or did further such an act of cruelty.

SEVENTEENTH COUNT

AND THE GRAND JURY AFORESAID, by this Indictment, further accuses the defendant, of the crime of OVERDRIVING, TORTURING AND INJURING ANIMALS, in violation of the provisions of Section 353 of the Agriculture and Markets Law of the State of New York, committed as follows:

The said defendant, on or about and between the 1st day of March, 2016, and the 1st day of March, 2017, in the County of Orange, State of New York, did unjustifiably injure, maim, mutilate, or kill an animal, or did deprive an animal of necessary sustenance, food or drink, or caused or permitted an animal to be deprived of necessary food or drink or did further an act of cruelty to an animal, to wit: a horse, or did further such an act of cruelty.

EIGHTEENTH COUNT

AND THE GRAND JURY AFORESAID, by this Indictment, further accuses the defendant, of the crime of OVERDRIVING, TORTURING AND INJURING ANIMALS, in violation of the provisions of Section 353 of the Agriculture and Markets Law of the State of New York, committed as follows:

The said defendant, on or about and between the 1st day of March, 2016, and the 1st day of March, 2017, in the County of Orange, State of New York, did unjustifiably injure, maim, mutilate, or kill an animal, or did deprive an animal of necessary sustenance, food or drink, or caused or permitted an animal to be deprived of necessary food or drink or did further an act of cruelty to an animal, to wit: a horse, or did further such an act of cruelty.

NINETEENTH COUNT

AND THE GRAND JURY AFORESAID, by this Indictment, further accuses the defendant, of the crime of OVERDRIVING, TORTURING AND INJURING ANIMALS, in violation of the provisions of Section 353 of the Agriculture and Markets Law of the State of New York, committed as follows:

The said defendant, on or about and between the 1st day of March, 2016, and the 1st day of March, 2017, in the County of Orange, State of New York, did unjustifiably injure, maim, mutilate, or kill an animal, or did deprive an animal of necessary sustenance, food or drink, or caused or permitted an animal to be deprived of necessary food or drink or did further an act of cruelty to an animal, to wit: a horse, or did further such an act of cruelty.

TWENTIETH COUNT

AND THE GRAND JURY AFORESAID, by this Indictment, further accuses the defendant, of the crime of OVERDRIVING, TORTURING AND INJURING ANIMALS, in violation of the provisions of Section 353 of the Agriculture and Markets Law of the State of New York, committed as follows:

The said defendant, on or about and between the 1st day of March, 2016, and the 1st day of March, 2017, in the County of Orange, State of New York, did unjustifiably injure, maim, mutilate, or kill an animal, or did deprive an animal of necessary sustenance, food or drink, or caused or permitted an animal to be deprived of necessary food or drink or did further an act of cruelty to an animal, to wit: a horse, or did further such an act of cruelty.

 

View Indictment

 

November 8, 2017

Entered not guilty plea at arraignment

 

May 7, 2018 Bench trial begins

June 5, 2018 Bench trial resumes

June 6-8, 2018 No trial due to Judge’s unavailability

 

 

Tuesday, July 24, 2018

Judge finds Jeanne Ryan of Argus Farm Guilty

20 counts of animal cruelty, includes 10 felonies

Jeanne Ryan Guilty Animal Cruelty Horse Case Orange County NY
Jeanne Ryan convicted animal abuser in 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sentencing scheduled for September 6, 2018

She was immediately remanded to jail until her sentencing

 

In accordance with Rocky’s Law, Jeanne Ryan surrendered her remaining animals.

 

Sentence

Two years in jail (the maximum time allowed for her crimes)

Placed on Orange County, NY animal abuser registry

NO ANIMAL OWNERSHIP for 15 Years

 

A restitution hearing is scheduled for October 2, 2018

 

 

 

 

ALICE TARJAN v CAROLINE V. ROFFMAN and LIONSHARE DRESSAGE, LLC.

Palm Beach County

No. 17 CA 010790

 

A New Jersey plaintiff is suing Caroline V. Roffman and Lionshare Dressage, LLC in Florida alleging fraud for more than $500,000. Roffman allegedly sold Alice Tarjan’s dressage horse Fabrege for $900,000 despite a contract stating the horse was sold for $300,000.

 

View Tarjan v Roffman et al

Defendants’ Caroline Roffman and Lionshare Dressage Motion to Dismiss

 

Endel Ots deposition scheduled for February 21, 2018  – rescheduled for March

Bethany Peslar deposition scheduled February 21, 2018

 

The parties agreed to settle the case leading to the judge’s dismissal with prejudice on March 9, 2018.

Each paid their own costs and attorney fees.