California Veterinary Medical Board: Accused Melissa Ann Tyson, DVM

BEFORE THE VETERINARY MEDICAL BOARD
DEPARTMENT OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS
THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA

 

MELISSA ANN TYSON, DVM

CROWN CITY VETERINARY MEDICAL GROUP, INC.

2657 E. Washington Boulevard
Pasadena, CA 91107

Veterinary Medical License VET 13995

CROWN CITY VETERINARY MEDICAL
GROUP, INC.

MELISSA ANN TYSON, DVM
Managing Licensee
2657 E. Washington Boulevard
Pasadena, CA 91107
Premises Permit No. HSP 5890

Complainant alleges:

PARTIES

1. Annemarie Del Mugnaio (Complainant) brings this Accusation solely in her official
capacity’as the Executive Officer Of the Veterinary Medical Board, Department of Consumer
Affairs.

ACCUSATION

2. On or about May 25, 2000, the Veterinary Medical Board issued Veterinary Medicine
License Number VET 13995 to Melissa Ann Tyson (Respondent Tyson). The veterinary license
was in full force and effect at all times relevant to the charges brought herein and will expire on

October 31, 2018, unless renewed.

3. On or about November 24, 2003, the Veterinary Medical Board issued Premises
Permit Number HSP 5890 to Crown City Veterinary Medical Group, Inc., with Melissa Ann
Tyson as the managing licensee (Respondent Premises). The Premises Permit was in full force
and effect at all times relevant to the charges brought herein and will expire on May 31, 2018,
unless renewed.

JURISDICTION

4. This Accusation is brought before the Veterinary Medical Board (Board), Department
of Consumer Affairs, under the authority of the following laws. All section references are to the
Business and Professions Code unless otherwise indicated.

5. Section 118, subdivision (b) of the Code provides that the suspension, expiration,
surrender or cancellation of a license shall not deprive the Board of jurisdiction to proceed with a
disciplinary action during the period within. which the license may be renewed, restored, reissued
or reinstated. Pursuant to section 4843.5 of the Code, an expired certificate of registration may be
renewed at any time within five years after its expiration.

6. Section 4875 of the Code provides, in pertinent part, that the Board may revoke or
suspend the license of any person to practice veterinary medicine, or any branch thereof, in this
state for any causes provided in the Veterinary Medicine Practice Act (Bus. & Prof. Code, §4800,
et seq.). In addition, the Board has the authority to assess a fine not in excess of $5,000 against a
licensee for any of the causes specified in section 4883 of that code. Such fine may be assessed in
lieu of, or in addition to, a suspension or revocation.

7. Section 4853.6 of the Code provides, in pertinent part, that the Board. shall withhold,
suspend or revoke the registration of veterinary premises when the license of the licensee manager to
practice veterinary medicine is revoked or suspended.

8. Section 4883 of the Code states:

 . . . The board may deny, revoke, or suspend a license or assess a fine as provided in

Section 4875 for any of the following…

(c) Violation or attempting to violate, directly or indirectly, any of the provisions

of this chapter.

(d) Fraud or dishonesty in applying, treating, or reporting on tuberculin or other biological tests,

(g) Unprofessional conduct, that includes, but is not limited, to the following:

(i) Fraud, deception, negligence, or incompetence in the practice of veterinary
medicine.
(j) Aiding or abetting in any acts that are in violation of any of the provisions of this chapter.

9. California Code of Civil Procedure section 1822.50 states:

An inspection warrant is an order, in writing, in the name of the people, signed by a judge
of a court of record, directed to a state or local official, commanding him to conduct any
inspection required or authorized by state or local law or regulation relating to building, fire,
safety, plumbing, electrical, health, labor, or zoning.

10. California Food and Agricultural Code section 9562 states:

(a) Subject to the rights and procedures established pursuant to Chapter 4.5 (commencing
23 with Section 11400) of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code, and in accordance with
regulations adopted pursuant to this code, the State Veterinarian shall impose a quarantine if he or
she believes, upon any basis reasonably supportable by standard epidemiological practice or
credible scientific research, that a population of domestic animals or food product from animals
has contracted, or may carry, an illness, infection, pathogen, contagion, toxin, or condition that,

without intervention, could transmit an illness that could kill or seriously damage other animals or

humans, including, in addition to the original condition, those clinically plausible secondary
illnesses, infections, pathogens, contagions, toxins, or conditions arising from the effects of the
original.
(b) (1) Because the authority conferred by this section is designed to protect the health and
safety of the citizens of this state, the authority shall be interpreted broadly to give full effect to
the “purpose of protecting the public health and safety and shall be construed to include the
imposition of quarantines in the circumstances of natural disaster, Whether occurring or imminent,
or declared emergencies.
(2) In furtherance of the objectives of the quarantine, the State Veterinarian may impose
restrictions not only on the affected animals themselves. and the uses to which those animals may
be put, but on products produced from, by, or with those animals in order to minimize the risk or
spread of food-borne illness.
(3) The State Veterinarian’s quarantine powers set forth in this section expressly include
the power to order movement, segregation, isolation, or destruction of animals or food products,
as Well as the power to hold animals or food products in place,

11. California Food and Agricultural Code section 9563 states:
It is unlawful for any person to move or allow to be moved any of the animals, food product
from animals, vehicles, farm equipment, farm products, or other materials that are subject to
restrictions established pursuant to Section 9562 or 9569 unless that person has first obtained
authorization from the State Veterinarian.

12. California Food and Agricultural Code section 9564 states:
If it is necessary to restrict the movements of animals pursuant to Section 9562, the State
Veterinarian may fix and proclaim the boundaries of a quarantine area in lieu of separate,
individual orders issued to each owner pursuant to Section 9562. While the boundaries are in
force, it is unlawful for any person to move or allow to be moved any such animals from or within
the boundaries of the Quarantine area, unless that person is authorized to do so by the State
Veterinarian.

13. California Food and Agricultural Code section 9691 states:

It is unlawful for any person to remove or cause to be removed any animal from any

district, area, or premises which is quarantined pursuant to this chapter, except upon the

conditions Which are prescribed in this chapter.

14. California Food and Agricultural Code section 9695 states: It is unlawful for any person to hide,

secrete, or fail to disclose any animal or property that is suffering from, or that has been

exposed or potentially exposed to any disease subject to a current quarantine order or to fail

to disclose the whereabouts of that animal or property.

COST RECOVERY

15. Section 125.3 of the Code provides, in pertinent part, that the Board may request the
administrative law judge to direct a licentiate found to have committed a violation or violations of
the licensing act to pay a sum not to exceed the reasonable costs of the investigation and
enforcement of the case, with failure of the licentiate to comply subjecting the license to not being
renewed or reinstated. If a case settles, recovery of investigation and enforcement costs may be
included in a stipulated settlement.

FIRST CAUSE FOR DISCIPLINE
(Unprofessional Conduct)

16. Respondents Tyson and Premises are subject to disciplinary action under section
4883, subdivision (g) of the Code, in conjunction with California Food and Agriculture Code
sections 9562, 9563, 9564 and 9691, in that Respondent Tyson, displayed unprofessional conduct
by Violating a mandatory quarantine on November 22, 2016, when she removed her horse from a
state-mandated quarantine premise after it had exhibited clinical signs of a contagious disease.
Respondent Tyson further engaged in unprofessional conduct when she failed to comply with
enhanced biosecurity measures. The circumstances are as follows:

17. Commencing on or about November 3, 2016, the California Department of Food and
Agriculture (CDFA) issued equine quarantines at the Los Angeles Equestrian Center (LAEC) for

horses stabled in Barn A due to an outbreak of Equine Herpes Virus type 1 (EHV-l) pursuant to
it’s authority under Food and Agriculture Code section 9562. CDFA also ordered enhanced
biosecurity measures for the horses including mandatory twice daily temperature monitoring of all
animals in the quarantined area, security checkpoints, quarantine signage, caution tape and
barricades, bleach foot baths, and visitors must park away from the property.

18. On November 8, 2016, the equine quarantines were expanded to include horses
stabled at LAEC Barns B and C.

19. At all times relevant, Respondent Tyson was the owner and/or agent of a horse
stabled in Barn C at LAEC, known as “Emmy.”

20. On or about November 22, 2016, Respondent Tyson was notified by a CDFA
representative that Emmy had contracted a fever and needed to remain on the premises in
accordance with the quarantine procedures while they were awaiting EHV-l test results.

21. Instead, at approximately 5:00 pm. on November 22, 2016, after having been notified
of Emmy’s fever and while test results were still pending, Respondent Tyson came to LEAC with
a horse trailer and removed Emmy from the CDFA mandated quarantine without prior
authorization.

22. Respondent Tyson’s removal of Emmy from the quarantined area constituted
unprofessional conduct in that it violated the quarantine and allowed for the potential spread of
the infectious agent/disease to healthy horses at LEAC and placed healthy animals at risk of
contracting a dangerous and highly contagious disease outside the perimeter of the quarantine
area.

23. Respondent Tyson further exhibited unprofessional conduct when she failed to
comply with enhanced biosecurity measures put in place during the quarantine that were intended
to prevent the introduction and spread of EHV-l infectious diseases.

SECOND CAUSE FOR DISCIPLINE

(Unprofessional Conduct-Misrepresentation Regarding Clinical Findings of Infected Horse)

24. Respondents are subject to disciplinary action under section 4883, subdivisions (d),
(g) and (i) of the Code in that on November 22, 2016, Respondent Tyson misrepresented that
Emmy did not have a fever and was not displaying signs of illness and removed Emmy from Barn
C at LAEC where the horse had been subject to a CDFA quarantine.

THIRD CAUSE FOR DISCIPLINE
(Unprofessional Conduct-Failure to Disclose Location of infected animal)

25. Respondents are subject to disciplinary action under section 4883, subdivisions (g)
and (j) of the Code in conjunction with Food and Agriculture Code section 9695 where
Respondent Tyson failed to disclose the location of Emmy, an infected horse after the horse was
unlawfully removed from the LAEC mandatory quarantine on November 22, 2016. When
requested by the CDFA to provide Emmy’s location, Respondent Tyson failed and refused.
Moreover, even after CDFA obtained a court-ordered Inspection Warrant under Code of Civil. i
Procedure section 1822.50, Respondent Tyson refused to allow the inspectors to perform a
physical inspection of the horses present on her property on December 30, 2016, to determine
whether they were infected. Respondent Tyson’s actions constituted unprofessional conduct in
that she caused more than a 30-day delay in the containment of the spread of the EHV-l virus
and the potential exposure of the virus to other horses.

FOURTH CAUSE FOR DISCIPLINE
(Deception)

26. Respondents are subject to disciplinary action under section 4883, subdivisions (c), (i)
and (j) of the Code in that Respondent Tyson engaged in deception with the CDFA relating to the
failure to disclose the true circumstances relating to date and time of the euthanasia of the horse,
Emmy, after Respondent Tyson unlawfully removed Emmy from the mandatory quarantine.

The circumstances are as follows.

27. Respondent Tyson made false statements to CDFA when she stated her staff met with A.P.,

a representative of C.S., Emmy’s prior owner, to return ownership of Emmy back to C.S.

However, A.P. did not represent CS. and CS. did not authorize the transfer of ownership
from Respondent Tyson back to himself.

28. Respondent Tyson made false statements to CDFA when she stated that she received
a text message from her veterinary technician, Herbert Ramirez, at approximately 2:15 am. on
November 23, 2016, stating that A.P., as representative of CS, requested the euthanasia of
Emmy. However, A.P. was not a representative of CS. and CS. never requested euthanasia.

29. Respondent Tyson made false statements to CDFA when she stated that the pick-up,
disposal, and rendering of Emmy’s body occurred on November 23, 2016. However, this
information was false.

WHEREFORE, Complainant requests that a hearing be held on the matters herein alleged,
and that following the hearing, the Veterinary Medical Board issue a decision:
1.Revoking or suspending Veterinary Medical License Number VET 13995, issued to
Melissa Ann Tyson;
2. Revoking or suspending Premises Permit Number HSP 5890, issued to, Crown City
Veterinary Medical Group, Inc. with Melissa Ann Tyson as the managing licensee;
3. Ordering Melissa Ann Tyson and Crown City Veterinary Medical Group, Inc. jointly
and severally to pay the Veterinary Medical Board the reasonable costs of the investigation and
enforcement of this case, pursuant to Business and Professions Code section 125.3;
4. Assessing a fine against Melissa Ann Tyson, not in excess of $5,000 for any of the
causes specified in Business and Professions Code section 4883; and
5. Taking such other and further action as deemed necessary and proper.

 

View California Veterinary Medical Board Complaint

 


EHV Quarantine Violated by California Vet-Horse Owner

 

 

COMMONWEALTH OF VIRGINIA v. ROBIN RENEE VINCE

Nottoway County

No. CR-16000086-01

Robin Vince is a convicted felon with a prior animal cruelty conviction.
Robin Vince

 

July 2016

Indictment

Four felony animal cruelty counts (second offense within five years)

40 misdemeanor counts

[NOTE: In May 2017, the state nolle prosequi the charges against Robin Vince’s daughter Rhiannan Vitiello.]

 

May 2017 Trial 

Guilty

3 felony, 23 misdemeanor counts animal cruelty

Sentence

One-year jail, one-year suspended

No ownership or possession of any animal

 

Currently incarcerated at Piedmont Regional Jail

Scheduled release date August 8, 2018

 

May 1, 2018

Judge grants bond.

 

The Piedmont Regional Jail released Robin Vince from custody on May 3, 2018. 

 

Vince Sentenced for Animal Cruelty

Convicted Animal Abusers Face 132 Counts Animal Cruelty in VA

40 Horses Seized in Virginia from Convicted Animal Abuser

 


Nottoway County

No. 13-000199-00

 

Arrest

November 7, 2013

 

Charge

Cruelty to animals

Guilty at trial

Sentence

12 months jail, all suspended

$1,000 fine

$3826.74 costs

 

Virginia Horse Farm Owner Convicted of Animal Cruelty – Again

 

Pony Cookies with Love

Peppermint Kisses for Ponies

Christmas means family, friends, and all of this puts me in the mood to bake, even for my ponies. A half cup flour, a quarter cup oats, apple, and lots of love go into these homemade Peppermint Kisses.

Here’s a recipe for Peppermint Kisses you can share with everyone at the barn. Or imagine Christmas morning when all of the horses’ stockings are full of these tiny delights from a secret gift giver. How fun for everyone!

 

Here’s what you’ll need. 

1 1/4 cup steel cut oats

3/4 cup molasses

1/2 cup  flour

1/2 cup flax seed

2 tsp cornstarch

1/4 cup water

1/4 cup apple pieces

12 peppermint candies

Now that we have everything we’re ready to bake.

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

2. Mix molasses and oats until oats are coated then gradually stir in your flour, flax seed, apples, cornstarch until mixed.

3. Grease muffin tin then fill them half full.

4. Bake for 15 minutes or until done.

5. Press peppermints onto tops then remove muffins from tin and let cool.

6. Feed generously to loved ponies and horses!

 

Like anything in the kitchen, you can add your creativity and love to make this recipe your own!

Store in a sealed container.

 

 

 

STATE OF NEW YORK v JEANNE RYAN

Orange County

No. 00785-2017

 

October 30, 2017

Orange County Grand Jury Indicts Jeanne Ryan

 

THE GRAND JURY OF THE COUNTY OF ORANGE, by this Indictment, accuses the defendant of the crime of AGGRAVATED CRUELTY TO ANIMALS, in violation of the provisions of Section 353-a, Subdivision 1, of the Agriculture and Markets Law of the State of New York, committed as follows:

The said defendant, on or about and between the 1st day of March, 2017, and the 29th day of July, 2017, in the County of Orange, State of New York, with no justifiable purpose, did intentionally kill or cause serious physical injury to a companion animal, to wit: a horse, with aggravated cruelty.

SECOND COUNT

AND THE GRAND JURY AFORESAID, by this Indictment, further accuses the defendant, of the crime of

AGGRAVATED CRUELTY TO ANIMALS, in violation of the provisions of Section 353-a, Subdivision 1, of the Agriculture and Markets Law of the State of New York, committed as follows:

The said defendant, on or about and between the 1st day of March, 2017, and the 29th day of July, 2017, in the County of Orange, State of New York, with no justifiable purpose, did intentionally kill or cause serious physical injury to a companion animal, to wit: a horse, with aggravated cruelty.

THIRD COUNT

AND THE GRAND JURY AFORESAID, by this Indictment, further accuses the defendant, of the crime of

AGGRAVATED CRUELTY TO ANIMALS, in violation of the provisions of Section 353-a, Subdivision 1, of the Agriculture and Markets Law of the State of New York, committed as follows:

The said defendant, on or about and between the 1st day of March, 2017, and the 29th day of July, 2017,in the County of Orange, State of New York, with no justifiable purpose, did intentionally kill or cause serious physical injury to a companion animal, to wit: a horse, with aggravated cruelty.

FOURTH COUNT

AND THE GRAND JURY AFORESAID, by this Indictment, further accuses the defendant, of the crime of

AGGRAVATED CRUELTY TO ANIMALS, in violation of the provisions of Section 353-a, Subdivision 1, of the Agriculture and Markets Law of the State of New York, committed as follows:

The said defendant, on or about and between the 1st day of March, 2017, and the 29th day of July, 2017, in the County of Orange, State of New York, with no justifiable purpose, did intentionally kill or cause serious physical injury to a companion animal, to wit: a horse, with aggravated cruelty.

FIFTH COUNT

AND THE GRAND JURY AFORESAID, by this Indictment, further accuses the defendant, of the crime of

AGGRAVATED CRUELTY TO ANIMALS, in violation of the provisions of Section 353-a, Subdivision 1, of the Agriculture and Markets Law of the State of New York, committed as follows:

The said defendant, on or about and between the 1st day of March, 2017, and the 29th day of July, 2017, in the County of Orange, State of New York, with no justifiable purpose, did intentionally kill or cause serious physical injury to a companion animal, to wit: a horse, with aggravated cruelty.

SIXTH COUNT

AND THE GRAND JURY AFORESAID, by this Indictment, further accuses the defendant, of the crime of

AGGRAVATED CRUELTY TO ANIMALS, in violation of the provisions of Section 353-a, Subdivision 1, of the Agriculture and Markets Law of the State of New York, committed as follows:

The said defendant, on or about and between the 1st day of March, 2017, and the 29th day of July, 2017, in the County of Orange, State of New York, with no justifiable purpose, did intentionally kill or cause serious physical injury to a companion animal, to wit: a horse, with aggravated cruelty.

SEVENTH COUNT

AND THE GRAND JURY AFORESAID, by this Indictment, further accuses the defendant, of the crime of

AGGRAVATED CRUELTY TO ANIMALS, in violation of the provisions of Section 353-a, Subdivision 1, of the Agriculture and Markets Law of the State of New York, committed as follows:

The said defendant, on or about and between the 1st day of March, 2016, and the 1st day of March, 2017, in the County of Orange, State of New York, with no justifiable purpose, did intentionally kill or cause serious physical injury to a companion animal, to wit: a horse, with aggravated cruelty.

EIGHTH COUNT

AND THE GRAND JURY AFORESAID, by this Indictment, further accuses the defendant, of the crime of

AGGRAVATED CRUELTY TO ANIMALS, in violation of the provisions of Section 353-a, Subdivision 1, of the Agriculture and Markets Law of the State of New York, committed as follows:

The said defendant, on or about and between the 1st day of March, 2016, and the 1st day of March, 2017, in the County of Orange, State of New York, with no justifiable purpose, did intentionally kill or cause serious physical injury to a companion animal, to wit: a horse, with aggravated cruelty.

NINTH COUNT

AND THE GRAND JURY AFORESAID, by this Indictment, further accuses the defendant, of the crime of

AGGRAVATED CRUELTY TO ANIMALS, in violation of the provisions of Section 353-a, Subdivision 1, of the Agriculture and Markets Law of the State of New York, committed as follows:

The said defendant, on or about and between the 1st day of March, 2016, and the 1st day of March, 2017, in the County of Orange, State of New York, with no justifiable purpose, did intentionally kill or cause serious physical injury to a companion animal, to wit: a horse, with aggravated cruelty.

TENTH COUNT

AND THE GRAND JURY AFORESAID, by this Indictment, further accuses the defendant, of the crime of

AGGRAVATED CRUELTY TO ANIMALS, in violation of the provisions of Section 353-a, Subdivision 1, of the Agriculture and Markets Law of the State of New York, committed as follows:

The said defendant, on or about and between the 1st day of March, 2016, and the 1st day of March, 2017, in the County of Orange, State of New York, with no justifiable purpose, did intentionally kill or cause serious physical injury to a companion animal, to wit: a horse, with aggravated cruelty.

ELEVENTH COUNT

AND THE GRAND JURY AFORESAID, by this Indictment, further accuses the defendant, of the crime of OVERDRIVING, TORTURING AND INJURING ANIMALS, in violation of the provisions of Section 353 of the Agriculture and Markets Law of the State of New York, committed as follows:

The said defendant, on or about and between the 1st day of March, 2017, and the 29th day of July, 2017, in the County of Orange, State of New York, did unjustifiably injure, maim, mutilate, or kill an animal, or did deprive an animal of necessary sustenance, food or drink, or caused or permitted an animal to be deprived of necessary food or drink or did further an act of cruelty to an animal, to wit: a horse, or did further such an act of cruelty.

TWELFTH COUNT

AND THE GRAND JURY AFORESAID, by this Indictment, further accuses the defendant, of the crime of OVERDRIVING, TORTURING AND INJURING ANIMALS, in violation of the provisions of Section 353 of the Agriculture and Markets Law of the State of New York, committed as follows:

The said defendant, on or about and between the 1st day of March, 2017, and the 29th day of July, 2017, in the County of Orange, State of New York, did unjustifiably injure, maim, mutilate, or kill an animal, or did deprive an animal of necessary sustenance, food or drink, or caused or permitted an animal to be deprived of necessary food or drink or did further an act of cruelty to an animal, to wit: a horse, or did further such an act of cruelty.

THIRTEEN COUNT

AND THE GRAND JURY AFORESAID, by this Indictment, further accuses the defendant, of the crime of OVERDRIVING, TORTURING AND INJURING ANIMALS, in violation of the provisions of Section 353 of the Agriculture and Markets Law of the State of New York, committed as follows:

The said defendant, on or about and between the 1st day of March, 2017, and the 29th day of July, 2017, in the County of Orange, State of New York, did unjustifiably injure, maim, mutilate, or kill an animal, or did deprive an animal of necessary sustenance, food or drink, or caused or permitted an animal to be deprived of necessary food or drink or did further an act of cruelty to an animal, to wit: a horse, or did further such an act of cruelty.

FOURTEENTH COUNT

AND THE GRAND JURY AFORESAID, by this Indictment, further accuses the defendant, of the crime of OVERDRIVING, TORTURING AND INJURING ANIMALS, in violation of the provisions of Section 353 of the Agriculture and Markets Law of the State of New York, committed as follows:

The said defendant, on or about and between the 1st day of March, 2017, and the 29th day of July, 2017, in the County of Orange, State of New York, did unjustifiably injure, maim, mutilate, or kill an animal, or did deprive an animal of necessary sustenance, food or drink, or caused or permitted an animal to be deprived of necessary food or drink or did further an act of cruelty to an animal, to wit: a horse, or did further such an act of cruelty.

FIFTEENTH COUNT

AND THE GRAND JURY AFORESAID, by this Indictment, further accuses the defendant, of the crime of OVERDRIVING, TORTURING AND INJURING ANIMALS, in violation of the provisions of Section 353 of the Agriculture and Markets Law of the State of New York, committed as follows:

The said defendant, on or about and between the 1st day of March, 2017, and the 29th day of July, 2017, in the County of Orange, State of New York, did unjustifiably injure, maim, mutilate, or kill an animal, or did deprive an animal of necessary sustenance, food or drink, or caused or permitted an animal to be deprived of necessary food or drink or did further an act of cruelty to an animal, to wit: a horse, or did further such an act of cruelty.

SIXTEENTH COUNT

AND THE GRAND JURY AFORESAID, by this Indictment, further accuses the defendant, of the crime of OVERDRIVING, TORTURING AND INJURING ANIMALS, in violation of the provisions of Section 353 of the Agriculture and Markets Law of the State of New York, committed as follows:

The said defendant, on or about and between the 1st day of March, 2017, and the 29th day of July, 2017, in the County of Orange, State of New York, did unjustifiably injure, maim, mutilate, or kill an animal, or did deprive an animal of necessary sustenance, food or drink, or caused or permitted an animal to be deprived of necessary food or drink or did further an act of cruelty to an animal, to wit: a horse, or did further such an act of cruelty.

SEVENTEENTH COUNT

AND THE GRAND JURY AFORESAID, by this Indictment, further accuses the defendant, of the crime of OVERDRIVING, TORTURING AND INJURING ANIMALS, in violation of the provisions of Section 353 of the Agriculture and Markets Law of the State of New York, committed as follows:

The said defendant, on or about and between the 1st day of March, 2016, and the 1st day of March, 2017, in the County of Orange, State of New York, did unjustifiably injure, maim, mutilate, or kill an animal, or did deprive an animal of necessary sustenance, food or drink, or caused or permitted an animal to be deprived of necessary food or drink or did further an act of cruelty to an animal, to wit: a horse, or did further such an act of cruelty.

EIGHTEENTH COUNT

AND THE GRAND JURY AFORESAID, by this Indictment, further accuses the defendant, of the crime of OVERDRIVING, TORTURING AND INJURING ANIMALS, in violation of the provisions of Section 353 of the Agriculture and Markets Law of the State of New York, committed as follows:

The said defendant, on or about and between the 1st day of March, 2016, and the 1st day of March, 2017, in the County of Orange, State of New York, did unjustifiably injure, maim, mutilate, or kill an animal, or did deprive an animal of necessary sustenance, food or drink, or caused or permitted an animal to be deprived of necessary food or drink or did further an act of cruelty to an animal, to wit: a horse, or did further such an act of cruelty.

NINETEENTH COUNT

AND THE GRAND JURY AFORESAID, by this Indictment, further accuses the defendant, of the crime of OVERDRIVING, TORTURING AND INJURING ANIMALS, in violation of the provisions of Section 353 of the Agriculture and Markets Law of the State of New York, committed as follows:

The said defendant, on or about and between the 1st day of March, 2016, and the 1st day of March, 2017, in the County of Orange, State of New York, did unjustifiably injure, maim, mutilate, or kill an animal, or did deprive an animal of necessary sustenance, food or drink, or caused or permitted an animal to be deprived of necessary food or drink or did further an act of cruelty to an animal, to wit: a horse, or did further such an act of cruelty.

TWENTIETH COUNT

AND THE GRAND JURY AFORESAID, by this Indictment, further accuses the defendant, of the crime of OVERDRIVING, TORTURING AND INJURING ANIMALS, in violation of the provisions of Section 353 of the Agriculture and Markets Law of the State of New York, committed as follows:

The said defendant, on or about and between the 1st day of March, 2016, and the 1st day of March, 2017, in the County of Orange, State of New York, did unjustifiably injure, maim, mutilate, or kill an animal, or did deprive an animal of necessary sustenance, food or drink, or caused or permitted an animal to be deprived of necessary food or drink or did further an act of cruelty to an animal, to wit: a horse, or did further such an act of cruelty.

 

View Indictment

 

November 8, 2017

Entered not guilty plea at arraignment

 

April 27, 2018, Pretrial conference scheduled

 

May 7, 2018 Bench trial begins

June 5, 2018 Bench trial resumes

June 6-8, 2018 No trial due to Judge’s unavailability

 


ALICE TARJAN v CAROLINE V. ROFFMAN and LIONSHARE DRESSAGE, LLC.

Palm Beach County

No. 17 CA 010790

 

A New Jersey plaintiff is suing Caroline V. Roffman and Lionshare Dressage, LLC in Florida alleging fraud for more than $500,000. Roffman allegedly sold Alice Tarjan’s dressage horse Fabrege for $900,000 despite a contract stating the horse was sold for $300,000.

 

View Tarjan v Roffman et al

Defendants’ Caroline Roffman and Lionshare Dressage Motion to Dismiss

 

Endel Ots deposition scheduled for February 21, 2018  – rescheduled for March

Bethany Peslar deposition scheduled February 21, 2018

 

The parties agreed to settle the case leading to the judge’s dismissal with prejudice on March 9, 2018.

Each paid their own costs and attorney fees.

 

 

 

STATE OF FLORIDA vs. SCOTT JOSEPH LANGTON

Orange County

No. 2017-CF-10952

Find closed civil and criminal equine court cases at Horse Authority. Read the court documents and get the final dispositions.

Scott Langton arrest for sexual battery (intoxicating substance)
Scott Langton arrested on September 21, 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Charge

SEXUAL BATTERY (INTOXICATING SUBSTANCE)

$15,000 bond in Orange County – released

surrendered passport

October 11, 2017 – arraignment scheduled

October 24, 2017 – case dismissed after Scott Langton’s October 4 suicide

 


No. 59-2017-CF 000150A

Seminole County

Find closed civil and criminal equine court cases at Horse Authority. Read the court documents and get the final dispositions.

Arrest

January 5, 2017

Charged

1 count felony drug possession – schedule IV Diazepam

1 count felony possession cocaine

1 count misdemeanor DUI

1 count misdemeanor leaving the scene of a crash involving damage to property

1 ticket careless driving

Out on $24,000 bond

Plea of Not Guilty (waived arraignment)

August 17, 2017

Scott Langton enters plea of Nolo Contendere

Judge adjudicates Langton guilty

Sentence

  • Langton enters drug court for drug charges – report to state probation
  • Court costs
  • Probation for 1 year, no alcohol
  • 50 hours of public service completed by May
  • Driver’s license suspended for 6 months

 

September 28

Drug court terminated and case sent back to criminal docket

Next court appearance scheduled for November 1, 2017

October 6, 2017

Case Nolle Prosquei 

 

Commonwealth of Pennsylvania v. Jane E. Ervin

Bucks County

Find closed civil and criminal equine court cases at Horse Authority. Read the court documents and get the final dispositions.

CR-0004988-2016

 

June 2016

Theft By Unlaw Taking-Movable Prop

Conspiracy – Theft By Unlaw Taking-Movable Prop

Theft By Decep-False Impression

Access Device Issued to Another Who Did Not Auth Use

Theft By Fail To Make Req Disp Funds

 

 

January 2017

Guilty plea

Access Device Issued to Another Who Did Not Auth Use

Theft By Fail To Make Req Disp Funds

 

A judge sentenced one-time New Jersey equestrian Jane E. Ervin and her husband to prison for bilking her ailing mother out of $271K.

Ervin’s 89-year-old victim was suffering from dementia, depression, and anxiety while her daughter kept her from paying her bills. Staff at the assisted living facility resorted to dressing her in donated clothing.

Instead, Ervin used her mother’s funds to put a deposit on a BMW in 2015, according to the prosecutor. She also went on a vacation during the investigation.

Jane Ervin’s husband Albert Ferrara also pleaded guilty and received the same sentence. He is a retired Philadelphia police officer.

 

 

June 2017

Sentence

11 months and 15 days in prison (minimum) and 23 months (max)

7 years probation (max) to run concurrently with other confinement

Pay restitution of $271,327.67

No contact with victim (who is Jane E. Ervin’s mother)

 

 

December 18, 2017

Petition for house arrest granted

Jane E. Ervin is currently on house arrest

 

 

STATE OF TEXAS VS. MICHAEL RYAN HOGAN

Montgomery County

Case No. 17-07-08647
 July 20, 2017
Michael Hogan arrested on a warrant
Charge
2 counts felony sexual assault of a child (remain pending)
Released on $75,000 bond
December 2017
Indictment Filed
l SEXUAL ASSAULT 0F A CHILD – F2
IN THE NAME AND BY AUTHORITY OF THE STATE OF TEXAS:
THE GRAND JURY, for the County of Montgomery, State of Texas, duly selected, empaneled,
sworn, charged, and organized as such by the 221st Judicial District Court for said County, upon their
oaths present in and to said Court that Michael Ryan Hogan, on or about July 11, 2016, and before thc
presentment of this indictment, in the County and State aforesaid, did then and there intentionally or
knowingly cause defendant’s mouth and/or tongue to penetrate the sexual organ of **, a child,
Against the Peace and Dignity of the State.
Court date scheduled for June 26, 2018

 

 

 

Horse Show Dads: Horses Can Improve Your Golf Game

Enhancing the mental game

For equestrians trying to justify those monthly horse expenses to their horse show dads (or moms), there’s good news. Horses are helping golfers improve their performance and consistency on the golf course.

Avid, albeit, self-confessed mediocre golfer Bob Carney of Golf Digest was ready to give [even] horses his best shot if they could improve his lack-luster golf game. Could horses be the golfer’s unicorn?

Carney mentally prepared for his day – putt, meet a horse and putt again.

Carney wasn’t on the adventure alone – he was part of the herd. He was working with Sports Psychologist Debbie Crews, Ph.D., who has spent more than 25-years researching golf. She consults for Arizona State University’s Golf Teams and founded an Arizona-based equine therapy program.

Carney’s day didn’t involve horseback riding rather it was a time to build a bond some may never experience. It began with his selection of the Percheron mare Nellie. Their connection begins to slowly emerge.

Horsemanship trainer Buck Brannaman explains it best in his documentary, Buck. “The horse is a mirror to your soul. Sometimes you might not like what you see. Sometimes you will.”

Horses are prey animals, for that reason, they are always engaged. They offer instant feedback that is accurate and mirrors your behavior.

“I finish by canning three 10-footers. Probably the best I’ve ever putted in my life,” Carney says after his post-horse therapy putting session.

Find out more about Carney’s experience and the other golfers benefiting from equine therapy to strengthen their mental game at “Courses with Horses”.

 

 

 

EIA Confirmed in North Carolina Mule

Deadly disease

North Carolina Ag officials confirm a mule tested positive for the deadly Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA) last week.

A veterinarian pulled blood from the 14-year-old female or mollie mule located in Johnston County for a routine Coggins test. Due to the positive test results, a veterinarian euthanized the mule.

The NC Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services has placed the facility under quarantine. Veterinarians tested the facility’s remaining equines which were negative for EIA. The state continues to monitor the animals and will retest them in 60 days.

The disease, also called swamp fever, affects horses, donkeys, and mules. There is no cure or vaccine to prevent EIA.

Biting insects typically transmit EIA which is a blood-borne illness. The use of infected needles can also transmit EIA from equine to equine.

Affected equines can carry the disease without symptoms for years. They may become acutely or chronically infected. EIA attacks the equine’s immune system.

Clinical signs of EIA include fever, weakness, weight loss, anemia and edema, and death. All infected equines, including those that are asymptomatic, are carriers of the disease.

To help prevent the disease, veterinarians recommend insect control, good horse facility sanitation, testing new equines with a Coggins test before bringing them onto your property, and quarantining new equines for 45 days.

Although agriculture officials keep tight control over EIA which limits outbreaks across the U.S., there have been eight confirmed cases in Kansas in the last month. Canadian officials have reported 14 cases of EIA in Manitoba since June.

The last reported case of the disease in North Carolina was in 2005.

Hurricane Harvey Horses Endure as Irma Eyes Florida

Resource helps Hurricane horses

As Texans assess the damage done by Hurricane Harvey, rescuers continue pulling horses from the flood ravaged Gulf coast.

Florida horse owners are also facing uncertainty as Hurricane Irma could reach the state in the coming days. The National Hurricane Center warns Irma, which is currently producing Category 5 winds in the Atlantic Ocean, is capable of “catastrophic damage”.

The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services has temporarily suspended intrastate import requirements, which include a Coggins and health certificate.

Before Florida horses leave the state they still must go through one of the Agriculture Inspection Stations. The Ag Station will provide documentation allowing each horse’s re-entry into the state.

The states of Alabama, Georgia, and Mississippi have suspended their interstate import requirements for Florida horses.

Horse farms accepting evacuees from Florida [click the link to see available stabling for Florida horses] may require a current negative Coggins. Take your horse’s Coggins along with proper identification and vaccination records, if available.

If you want to help the surviving Hurricane horses, but don’t know, here’s the good news.

You don’t have to be a diehard cowboy like Chance Ward and his teen son, Rowdy, in Texas. Over the last week, they have ventured into flood waters by horseback and boat saving countless people, horses, and pets. Ward never mentioned it, but he owns the feed store Last Chance Feed & More, located in Cleveland.

Horse owners and animal lovers alike have a tool to become a horse helper for at-risk equines before, during, and after natural disasters strike. The goal is to provide resources including stabling, horse transportation, and horse feed. The help is offered by horse people just like you.

Become a horse helper with just the click of your mouse.

 

Rowdy Ward saves a horse as flood waters rise.

Four of the five horses stuck on the porch survived.

 

Kansas Confirms 2 More EIA Positive Horses

Incurable Disease

Officials confirm two more horses in southwestern Kansas have tested positive for an incurable, infectious disease.

The Kansas Department of Agriculture’s Division of Animal Health said last week that it received confirmation that the two horses located in different counties, Finney and Kearny counties, tested positive for Equine Infectious Anemia (EIA).

Officials conducted surveillance, identified, and tested more than 800 horses connected to the index case. The investigation led to the discovery of the two additional positive EIA horses.

Last month, six horses in Finney County tested positive for EIA. The Department states the horses had recently been on the index premises, an unsanctioned, informal horse racing facility in rural Garden City.

Veterinarians euthanized all of the EIA-positive horses because there is no cure.

The state has quarantined the exposed horses remaining on the premises where EIA was confirmed. Veterinarians will retest those horses’ blood in 60 days by utilizing a Coggins test.

EIA attacks the horse’s immune system. Clinical signs of EIA include fever, anemia, and edema; however, affected horses may not show symptoms. All infected horses, including those which are asymptomatic, are carriers of the disease.

Biting insects typically transmit EIA which is a blood-borne illness. The use of infected needles can also transmit EIA from horse to horse.

To help prevent the disease, veterinarians recommend insect control, good sanitation, testing new horses with a Coggins test before bringing them onto your property, and quarantining new horses for 45 days.

Prior to 2017, Kansas had nine cases of EIA over a 10-year period.

 

EHV-1 Confirmed at Second Virginia Farm, 2 Horses Euthanized

Unrelated to EHV-1 at Culpeper farm

Virginia’s state veterinarian confirms two King William County horses tested positive for the neurologic strain of the equine herpes virus (EHV-1) leading to their euthanasia.

Equine herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy (EHM) is another name for the neurologic manifestation of the highly contagious virus. Experts state neurologic deficiencies appear after the infection damages blood vessels in the horse’s brain and spinal cord.

The Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (VDACS) quarantined the pleasure horse farm after four horses began showing neurologic-like symptoms. Most noteworthy, no horses have been off the private property in a year.

The department announced an unrelated EHV-1 quarantine at a private Culpeper County horse farm on August 15, which remains in place. To date, three horses tested positive for EHM from that location, including one that was euthanized.

VDACS state veterinarian Dr. Charles Broaddus recommends common sense solutions like practicing good biosecurity to minimize the spread of diseases.

“A large percentage of horses carry the virus with no clinical signs for the remainder of their lives.” Dr. Broaddus adds horses can spontaneously shed it in their nasal secretions. “Rarely this causes exposed horses to develop the neurologic form of the disease.”

Veterinarians recommend vaccinating against EHV-1 to help prevent the virus although no current vaccine prevents the neurologic strain.

Symptoms that should alert horse owners to the possibility of a neurologic EHV-1 infection include a fever over 101.5 degrees, weakness, incoordination, urine dribbling or the inability to stand.

A veterinarian should immediately examine horses with these symptoms.

 

Kountz Pleads No Contest to Felony Animal Cruelty

Plea Deal

A Montana horse arena owner has pleaded no contest to felony animal cruelty. Dayle Kountz kept his stallion alive without veterinary care for months although the horse was missing part of its lower leg, records state.

The Bozeman defendant appeared in Gallatin County District Court Wednesday after making a deal with the prosecutor’s office. The state agreed to drop the additional charges of aggravated animal cruelty and felony animal cruelty. One stemmed from Kountz allegedly allowing a comatose calf to suffer.

By entering a no contest plea, Kountz doesn’t admit guilt while acknowledging the prosecution has enough evidence for a conviction. The court treats it the same as a guilty plea.

Authorities began investigating Kountz in March 2015. Horse show competitors at Kountz Arena found Young Doc Bar emaciated, lying in his own filth with a bloody stump instead of a leg.

Documents state Kountz kept the stallion alive after a December 2014 accident to collect the horse’s semen. Doc’s foot rotted off at the fetlock joint about two months later. Kountz euthanized the stallion and calf once authorities got involved.

Kountz owns some 40 horses and has a prior animal cruelty conviction from 1999.

As a part of the plea deal, the prosecution will recommend a two-year suspended sentence meaning Kountz wouldn’t serve any time.

The defense is seeking a deferred sentence. It allows a defendant to serve a probation-like sentence with requirements that can lead to the case’s dismissal if completed successfully.

District Judge Brad Newman is scheduled to sentence Kountz on September 14. While the prosecutor and defense will make their recommendations, the judge has the final say regarding Kountz and his sentence.

 

View Case 

 

 

Absolute Insurer Rule for Trainers Unconstitutional: Kentucky Court

Reversal of KHRC Ruling

A Kentucky court finds that the Kentucky Horse Racing Commission’s absolute insurer rule for trainers is unconstitutional. The totality of the ruling could impact future drug and medication guidelines and due process for horse show association members.

Racehorse trainer H. Graham Motion and the owner of Kitten’s Point appealed the Commission’s sanction to the Franklin Circuit Court. The horse tested positive for a trace amount of the muscle relaxant methocarbamol which exceeded the allowable limit. The KHRC suspended Motion for five days, imposed a fine, and ordered the horse’s owner to forfeit a $90,000 purse.

Judge Thomas Wingate reversed the KHRC’s decision because it did not act within the constraints of its statutorily granted power. He adds the absolute insurer rule deprives trainers of due process if they’re not allowed to challenge “the rebuttable presumption of a violation”.

The Court also notes the KHRC “failed to produce evidence that amounted to more than mere speculation about the effect of Methocarbamol”.

Kentucky courts have ruled previously that the Commission must provide a scientific rationale when imposing drug regulations otherwise the group exceeds its scope.

Despite disagreement from its laboratory head, the KHRC adopted the drug regulation obtained from the Racing Medication and Testing Consortium (RMTC) without any additional testing, court documents note.

The opinion states the methocarbamol threshold was “arbitrary and capricious”.

Multiple veterinarians added that the methocarbamol level of 2.9 nanograms per milliliter (ng/ml) found in the filly’s serum would not impact the horse. The KHRC doesn’t allow more than 1 ng/ml in a horse’s serum while racing.

It is important to note the Kentucky case involves state government, unlike horse show organizations which are private.

 

View Opinion

 

 

Equine Infectious Anemia Deadly for 6 Kansas Horses

Coggins test

A veterinarian euthanized six Kansas horses after they tested positive for equine infectious anemia (EIA).

The Kansas Department of Agriculture quarantined the Finney County equine facility where additional horses remain. Veterinarians will pull the remaining horses’ blood in 60 days to run additional Coggins tests to determine if antibodies are present.

The Department was contacted this month about a horse in the southwestern part of the state infected with EIA. Testing of the exposed horses led to the discovery of five more EIA positive horses.

The disease, also called swamp fever, affects horses, donkeys, and mules. There is no cure or vaccine to prevent EIA.

Biting insects typically transmit EIA which is a blood-borne illness. The use of infected needles can also transmit EIA from horse to horse.

Affected horses can carry the disease without symptoms for years or they may become acutely or chronically infected. EIA attacks the horse’s immune system. Signs of the disease include fever, depression, anemia, and dependent edema.

To help prevent the disease, veterinarians recommend insect control, good sanitation, testing new horses with a Coggins test before bringing them onto your property, and quarantining new horses for 45 days.

 

Tiny Horse Makes Big Recovery after Leg Amputation

Destiny Pogo

A tiny horse makes a remarkable recovery after a traumatic dog attack.

The miniature horse Pogo completed his rehabilitation last week at Auburn Auburn University College of Veterinary Medicine. Pogo’s treatment followed a horrific dog attack that left him with only three legs. And he was the lucky one. The dogs killed his two mini horse companions.

A bus driver saw the three-legged mini running loose near a road in June leading to his rescue.

“The pony was in really poor condition,” Shelley Jones, Executive Director of Helping Horses Alabama said. “He was in such bad shape that we did not think he could survive”.

Pogo the Super Pony has a Super Man Prosthetic
Shelley Jones hopes Pogo can help people as a therapy animal.

Pogo’s will to live became evident soon after Jones rescued him.

The college’s Equine Sports Medicine and Surgery Service evaluated Pogo for “traumatic amputation of the left hind limb from his fetlock down to his hoof,” said Dr. Lindsey Boone. She noted the dog attack left exposed bone without adequate soft tissue protection.

The faculty recommendation was a surgical revision and permanent prosthesis.

“Pogo was reluctant to use the prosthesis originally, but through the hard work of our Rehabilitation Service, Pogo is using the limb well,” Dr.  Boone said.

Pogo’s prosthetic limb features a Superman design.

“I have never seen a horse fight so hard for its life,” Jones said. “He apparently has a purpose and a reason for being alive”.

Jones says once Pogo is fully recovered and rehabilitated, they will use him as a therapy animal to help people who have undergone limb amputations and wear a prosthetic.

 

Virginia Horse Euthanized, Farm Quarantined: EHV

Equine Herpesvirus Myeloencephalopathy (EHM)

Update August 16, 2017

Virginia officials confirm a Culpeper horse was euthanized due to the neurologic strain of the equine herpes virus (EHV-1). They have quarantined the horse’s originating farm.

The index horse began exhibiting neurologic signs on August 11 leading to its transport to the Marion duPont Scott Equine Medical Center in Leesburg. Staff isolated the horse and continue its supportive care.

The Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services’ (VDACS) Animal Health Lab in Warrenton confirmed a diagnosis of the neurologic strain of EHV. It is also known as equine herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy (EHM).

A second horse from the same farm developed a fever and neurologic symptoms leading to its euthanasia Monday. VDACS’ Animal Health Lab confirmed the same diagnosis.

The Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services states a new horse arrived at the private Culpeper farm 10 days before the first horse’s diagnosis. Additional horses remain, but cannot move on or off the farm for at least 21 days due to the quarantine. The horses’ vaccine histories are unknown by the state.

The virus

EHV-1 is highly contagious among horses. It can cause abortion, respiratory and neurologic disease. EHV-1 may lie dormant for long periods of time and then re-activate during a horse’s period of stress resulting in clinical disease.

Veterinarians recommend vaccinating against EHV-1 to help prevent the virus. No current vaccine prevents the neurological manifestation of the infection.

Symptoms may include fever, decreased coordination, nasal discharge, urine dribbling, hind limb weakness, and lethargy.

Veterinarians recommend biosecurity methods when showing or introducing new horses at your farm. These include limiting horse to horse contact and horse to human to horse contact. The virus spreads readily through direct contact with infected materials.

Hand soap, alcohol-based hand sanitizers, and sunlight neutralize the virus.

The Marion duPont Scott Equine Medical Center continues to treat equine patients.

 

 

New York Pony Breeder Charged after Horses’ Deaths

Starvation Deaths in Stalls

Update August 13, 2017

A New York Welsh Pony breeder is facing charges including animal cruelty after a tip led authorities to her gruesome secret.

Officials arrested Jeanne Ryan, 48, of Argus Farm in Goshen, NY after discovering severely decomposed remains of four adult horses and a foal that "presumably starved to death".
Jeanne Ryan

Officials arrested Jeanne Ryan, 48, of Argus Farm in Goshen after discovering the severely decomposed remains of four adult horses and a foal that “presumably starved to death” while locked in her barn.

The foal was in a nursing position.

Authorities seized an emaciated stallion stabled with a horse carcass. Known as Shamus, the pony was eating wood from the stable to survive because he had no food or water. He also had infected and overgrown hooves.

They found the remains of six more horses on the property.

Ryan faces a count of misdemeanor animal cruelty and five counts of failure to properly dispose of dead animals.

“I think she needs help – I think she needs medical help,” says Ryan’s former live-in boyfriend Angel Garcia of Elkton, KY.

The two lived together for four years on Ryan’s more than 40-acre farm. “I was the workhorse and I got tired of it,” Garcia adds. He characterizes Ryan as “lazy,” and says she spent all of her time on the internet.

Garcia tells us the Welsh Pony stallion Helio survived but he doesn’t think his Palomino horse was so lucky.

Authorities seized an emaciated stallion stabled with a horse carcass. Known as Shamus, the pony was eating wood from the stable trying to survive because he had no food or water. When Garcia left Ryan around 2015 he says he only got two of his four horses off the farm. When he tried to make arrangements for a horse transporter to pick up the last two, Garcia says Ryan, a retired NY Police Department officer, threatened to have him arrested if they came on her property. Garcia didn’t pursue his ownership rights further.

Some may know Ryan from her past work booking hauls for horse transporters. She reportedly used her Argus Farm as a layover facility.

Horses in good body condition, including the stallion Helio, and dogs, remain on the property. The horses’ hooves are in disrepair, according to officials.

Ryan is scheduled for arraignment on September 13.

 

 

Rita Crundwell Story Makes Film Debut

All the Queen’s Horses

A true crime documentary about the largest municipal fraud in U.S. history premieres this week. The film All The Queen’s Horses looks at how Rita Crundwell stole $53 million from a midwestern town without anyone noticing.

The former American Quarter Horse breeder siphoned millions from the small town of Dixon, IL. It happened during her more than 20-year career as the town’s comptroller. The stolen funds financed Crundwell’s extravagant horse show lifestyle while leaving the town in financial straits.

The documentary’s filmmaker Kelly Richmond Pope, Ph.D., CPA, is also a forensic accounting expert. She began interviewing people immediately after Crundwell’s April 2012 arrest and firing.
Pope says Crundwell knew she had absolute control and no one overseeing her. There were also no checks and balances in place. “Internal controls are critical in any industry.”

Crundwell is serving an almost 20-year federal prison sentence. She still owes Dixon $43 million even after the Feds sold her horses, properties, and everything she owned, according to one estimate.

Crundwell pays restitution monthly from the money she is paid for working in prison. It adds up to less than $70 monthly.

Pope tells Rate My Horse PRO Crundwell receives no funds from the project.

The documentary premieres on August 9th at 1 PM at the Run & Shoot Filmworks Martha’s Vineyard African American Film Festival.

 

View Rita Crundwell Case